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Soil aeration: —Essential for maximum plant growth

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Authors

J. Letey, University of California
L. H. Stolzy, U.C. Riverside
T. E. Szuszkiewicz, U.C. Riverside
N. Valoras, U.C. Los Angeles

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(3):6-7.

Published March 01, 1962

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Abstract

Soil aeration is an important factor in crop production. For maximum production, optimum levels of soil oxygen must be maintained as well as plant nutrient and water supplies. Experiments are being continued to learn more about the relationships between soil aeration and plant growth and to provide information leading to management for the highest production.

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Author notes

The progress report is based on Research Project No. 1966.

Soil aeration: —Essential for maximum plant growth

J. Letey, L. H. Stolzy, T. E. Szuszkiewicz, N. Valoras
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Soil aeration: —Essential for maximum plant growth

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. Letey, University of California
L. H. Stolzy, U.C. Riverside
T. E. Szuszkiewicz, U.C. Riverside
N. Valoras, U.C. Los Angeles

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(3):6-7.

Published March 01, 1962

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Soil aeration is an important factor in crop production. For maximum production, optimum levels of soil oxygen must be maintained as well as plant nutrient and water supplies. Experiments are being continued to learn more about the relationships between soil aeration and plant growth and to provide information leading to management for the highest production.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The progress report is based on Research Project No. 1966.


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