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Potash fertilizer on potatoes: Yields of field-run White Rose potatoes increased materially by potash treatments in fertilizer trials in Madera County

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Authors

Clarence E. Johnson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(7):10-11.

Published July 01, 1958

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Abstract

Out of 11 trials completed over a nine-year period, significant responses—increases as high as 31%—have been obtained from five out of six trials on Ripperdan soils. In the sixth trial on Ripperdan soil and in one trial out of three on Hanford soils, the response was only slightly below the degree of significance. No response was obtained in one trial each on a Ripperdan-Dinuba soil and on a Grangeville soil.

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Author notes

Forrest Fullmer of the American Potash Institute assisted in the above studies.

Potash fertilizer on potatoes: Yields of field-run White Rose potatoes increased materially by potash treatments in fertilizer trials in Madera County

Clarence E. Johnson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Potash fertilizer on potatoes: Yields of field-run White Rose potatoes increased materially by potash treatments in fertilizer trials in Madera County

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Clarence E. Johnson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(7):10-11.

Published July 01, 1958

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Out of 11 trials completed over a nine-year period, significant responses—increases as high as 31%—have been obtained from five out of six trials on Ripperdan soils. In the sixth trial on Ripperdan soil and in one trial out of three on Hanford soils, the response was only slightly below the degree of significance. No response was obtained in one trial each on a Ripperdan-Dinuba soil and on a Grangeville soil.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Forrest Fullmer of the American Potash Institute assisted in the above studies.


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