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Chlorine absorption: All portions of citrus trees grown in soil cultures absorbed chlorine in test

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Authors

Joseph N. Brusca, University of California
A. R. C. Haas, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(3):9-12.

Published March 01, 1958

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Abstract

Citrus trees utilize very little or no chlorine in their nutrition processes. They do, however, tend to accumulate chlorine in certain tissues. When such accumulations become excessive, they may cause the tissue to burn as in leaf tips and margins. In addition, the leaf size may be reduced and a fading may take place in the chlorophyll or green coloring matter of the leaves.

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Chlorine absorption: All portions of citrus trees grown in soil cultures absorbed chlorine in test

Joseph N. Brusca, A. R. C. Haas
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chlorine absorption: All portions of citrus trees grown in soil cultures absorbed chlorine in test

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Joseph N. Brusca, University of California
A. R. C. Haas, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(3):9-12.

Published March 01, 1958

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Citrus trees utilize very little or no chlorine in their nutrition processes. They do, however, tend to accumulate chlorine in certain tissues. When such accumulations become excessive, they may cause the tissue to burn as in leaf tips and margins. In addition, the leaf size may be reduced and a fading may take place in the chlorophyll or green coloring matter of the leaves.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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