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Splitting of Navel oranges: Studies indicate local temperature and humidity more closely related to incidence of injury than is soil moisture content

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Authors

O. C. Taylor, University of California
G. A. Cahoon, University of California
L. H. Stolxy, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(3):6-10.

Published March 01, 1958

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Abstract

Crop loss—of 20% or more—from the splitting of Navel oranges is no new problem. The trouble has plagued orange growers the world over and the general opinion seems to be that internal pressure develops within the fruit—probably as a result of extreme changes in moisture content associated with certain weather and soil moisture conditions—which ruptures the rind at the weakest point, the navel opening. Once started, the split usually expands rapidly dividing the fruit into two or more segments.

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Author notes

Weather data obtained from Citrus Grove Rejuvenation weather stations operated by Joseph R. Orlando, Technician in Horticulture, University of California, Riverside.

Splitting of Navel oranges: Studies indicate local temperature and humidity more closely related to incidence of injury than is soil moisture content

O. C. Taylor, G. A. Cahoon, L. H. Stolxy
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Splitting of Navel oranges: Studies indicate local temperature and humidity more closely related to incidence of injury than is soil moisture content

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

O. C. Taylor, University of California
G. A. Cahoon, University of California
L. H. Stolxy, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(3):6-10.

Published March 01, 1958

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Crop loss—of 20% or more—from the splitting of Navel oranges is no new problem. The trouble has plagued orange growers the world over and the general opinion seems to be that internal pressure develops within the fruit—probably as a result of extreme changes in moisture content associated with certain weather and soil moisture conditions—which ruptures the rind at the weakest point, the navel opening. Once started, the split usually expands rapidly dividing the fruit into two or more segments.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Weather data obtained from Citrus Grove Rejuvenation weather stations operated by Joseph R. Orlando, Technician in Horticulture, University of California, Riverside.


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