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Woolly and green apple aphids: Field trials with new materials in orchard near Watsonville indicate same timing of spray treatment controls both pests

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Authors

Harold F. Madsen, University of California
J. Blair Bailey, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(3):14-16.

Published March 01, 1958

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Abstract

Woolly apple aphid and green apple aphid are two of the more important pests of apple, especially in the coastal districts of northern California. Both are difficult to control because they are able to reinfest trees after spray applications.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 806-A

Woolly and green apple aphids: Field trials with new materials in orchard near Watsonville indicate same timing of spray treatment controls both pests

Harold F. Madsen, J. Blair Bailey
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Woolly and green apple aphids: Field trials with new materials in orchard near Watsonville indicate same timing of spray treatment controls both pests

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Harold F. Madsen, University of California
J. Blair Bailey, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(3):14-16.

Published March 01, 1958

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Woolly apple aphid and green apple aphid are two of the more important pests of apple, especially in the coastal districts of northern California. Both are difficult to control because they are able to reinfest trees after spray applications.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 806-A


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