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Effectiveness of wind machines: Frost protection by ramjet or conventional wind machines in deciduous orchards depends on the strength of the inversion

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Authors

G. E. Goodall, University of California
D. E. Angus, University of California
A. S. Leonard, University of California
F. A. Brooks, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(8):7-9.

Published August 01, 1957

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Abstract

When the atmosphere 40' to 50' above ground is 13°F or more warmer than it is a few feet above the soil surface, the temperature inversion condition—in frost protection research—is considered to be strong. When the temperature difference is less than about 5°F the inversion is considered weak. The weak inversions usually found in the deciduous orchards on the floor of the Sacramento Valley appear to limit the usefulness of wind machines for frost protection unless additional heat is supplied from orchard heaters.

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Author notes

The National Frost Protection Co.; Walter Stiles, almond grower; W. A. Gerrans, prune grower; Gerrans Manufacturing Co.; and J. Beckett, design engineer, Hiller Helicopters, cooperated in these tests.

C. E. Barbee, C. R. Miller, Fred Lory, and H. B. Schultz of the Department of Agricultural Engineering, Davis; N. W. Stice, Farm Advisor, Colusa County; R. R. Parks, Extension Agricultural Engineer, Davis, gave essential assistance in these studies.

This is the ninth annual progress report in the study of wind machines in orchards published in California Agrirulture.

Effectiveness of wind machines: Frost protection by ramjet or conventional wind machines in deciduous orchards depends on the strength of the inversion

G. E. Goodall, D. E. Angus, A. S. Leonard, F. A. Brooks
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effectiveness of wind machines: Frost protection by ramjet or conventional wind machines in deciduous orchards depends on the strength of the inversion

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

G. E. Goodall, University of California
D. E. Angus, University of California
A. S. Leonard, University of California
F. A. Brooks, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(8):7-9.

Published August 01, 1957

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

When the atmosphere 40' to 50' above ground is 13°F or more warmer than it is a few feet above the soil surface, the temperature inversion condition—in frost protection research—is considered to be strong. When the temperature difference is less than about 5°F the inversion is considered weak. The weak inversions usually found in the deciduous orchards on the floor of the Sacramento Valley appear to limit the usefulness of wind machines for frost protection unless additional heat is supplied from orchard heaters.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The National Frost Protection Co.; Walter Stiles, almond grower; W. A. Gerrans, prune grower; Gerrans Manufacturing Co.; and J. Beckett, design engineer, Hiller Helicopters, cooperated in these tests.

C. E. Barbee, C. R. Miller, Fred Lory, and H. B. Schultz of the Department of Agricultural Engineering, Davis; N. W. Stice, Farm Advisor, Colusa County; R. R. Parks, Extension Agricultural Engineer, Davis, gave essential assistance in these studies.

This is the ninth annual progress report in the study of wind machines in orchards published in California Agrirulture.


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