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New roots on pine seedlings: Greenhouse tests with ponderosa pine seedlings indicate time of transplanting affects rooting ability of seedling

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Authors

Edward C. Stone, University of California
Gilbert H. Schubert, U.S. Forest Service

Publication Information

California Agriculture 10(3):11-14.

Published March 01, 1956

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Abstract

Many cut-over forests in the California pine region are producing at much less than full capacity because of the practice of relying upon natural restocking by seed from the remaining trees. Some of these areas contain too few trees, some support trees of less desirable species, and some have been occupied by brush. If left as they are, many of these areas will require fifty to a hundred years before full production is achieved.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1577.

New roots on pine seedlings: Greenhouse tests with ponderosa pine seedlings indicate time of transplanting affects rooting ability of seedling

Edward C. Stone, Gilbert H. Schubert
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

New roots on pine seedlings: Greenhouse tests with ponderosa pine seedlings indicate time of transplanting affects rooting ability of seedling

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Edward C. Stone, University of California
Gilbert H. Schubert, U.S. Forest Service

Publication Information

California Agriculture 10(3):11-14.

Published March 01, 1956

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Many cut-over forests in the California pine region are producing at much less than full capacity because of the practice of relying upon natural restocking by seed from the remaining trees. Some of these areas contain too few trees, some support trees of less desirable species, and some have been occupied by brush. If left as they are, many of these areas will require fifty to a hundred years before full production is achieved.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1577.


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