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Die-back of blackberries: Study of causes and prevention of disease affecting Boysen and Young trailing blackberries

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Authors

Stephen Wilhelm, University of California College of Agriculture
C. Emlen Scott, University of California College of Agriculture
Richard A. Break, University of California College of Agriculture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 6(2):4-12.

Published February 01, 1952

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Abstract

A die-back disease affecting primarily the Boysen and Young trailing blackberries was prevalent in nearly all berry-growing regions of California during the winters of 1947—18 and 1948—19. It did not occur, or was much reduced in severity during the 1949-50 and 1950-51 winters.

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Die-back of blackberries: Study of causes and prevention of disease affecting Boysen and Young trailing blackberries

Stephen Wilhelm, C. Emlen Scott, Richard A. Break
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Die-back of blackberries: Study of causes and prevention of disease affecting Boysen and Young trailing blackberries

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Stephen Wilhelm, University of California College of Agriculture
C. Emlen Scott, University of California College of Agriculture
Richard A. Break, University of California College of Agriculture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 6(2):4-12.

Published February 01, 1952

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A die-back disease affecting primarily the Boysen and Young trailing blackberries was prevalent in nearly all berry-growing regions of California during the winters of 1947—18 and 1948—19. It did not occur, or was much reduced in severity during the 1949-50 and 1950-51 winters.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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