California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 75, No.1

Cover: 

Students at the Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History (a California Naturalist Partner) participating in a coastal LiMPETS (Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students) survey. Photo by Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History.

Special Issue
Community and citizen science
January-March 2021
Volume 75, Number 1
EDITORIAL
Community and citizen science: Inviting the public into UC ANR research
by Glenda Humiston
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Community and citizen science fosters an appreciation for the scientific process, building scientific literacy and public support for research.
INTRODUCTION
Special issue: Community and citizen science
by Ryan Meyer, Sabrina Drill, Christopher Jadallah
Full text HTML  | PDF  
In this special issue, California Agriculture presents research and news on community and citizen science projects across California.
NEWS
Report: Assessing community and citizen science at UC ANR
by Ryan Meyer, Sabrina Drill
Full text HTML  | PDF  
The authors uncovered a rich diversity of projects that engage Californians in UC ANR research, and a variety of challenges and opportunities for expanding this work.
NEWS
Community and citizen science projects around UC ANR
by Lucien Crowder
Full text HTML  | PDF  
What do coyotes, eggs and leafy greens have in common? They're all subjects of UC ANR research projects to which everyday Californians have contributed.

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Data parties engage 4-H volunteers in data interpretation, strengthening camp programs and evaluation process
by Marianne Bird, Kendra M. Lewis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A practice associated with citizen science allows 4-H stakeholders to better engage in program evaluation.
Participatory evaluation is a form of citizen science that brings program stakeholders into partnership with researchers to increase the understanding and value that evaluation provides. For the last four years, 4-H volunteers and staff have joined academics to assess the impact of the California 4-H camping program on youth and teen leaders in areas such as responsibility, confidence and leadership. Volunteers and nonacademic staff in the field informed the design of this multiyear impact study, collected data and engaged in data interpretation through “data parties.” In a follow-up evaluation of the data parties, we found that those who participated reported deeper understanding of and buy-in to the data. Participants also provided the research team insights into findings. By detailing the California 4-H Camp Evaluation case study, this paper describes the mutual benefits that accrue to researchers and volunteers when, through data parties, they investigate findings together.
The CALeDNA program: Citizen scientists and researchers inventory California's biodiversity
by Rachel S. Meyer, Miroslava Munguia Ramos, Meixi Lin, Teia M. Schweizer, Zachary Gold, Dannise Ruiz Ramos, Sabrina Shirazi, Gaurav Kandlikar, Wai-Yin Kwan, Emily E. Curd, Amanda Freise, Jordan Moberg Parker, Jason P. Sexton, Regina Wetzer, N. Dean Pentcheff, Adam R. Wall, Lenore Pipes, Ana Garcia-Vedrenne, Maura Palacios Mejia, Tiara Moore, Chloe Orland, Kimberly M. Ballare, Anna Worth, Eric Beraut, Emma L. Aronson, Rasmus Nielsen, Harris A. Lewin, Paul H. Barber, Jeff Wall, Nathan Kraft, Beth Shapiro, Robert K. Wayne
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
By connecting different grassroots eDNA projects, and making data open to explore, we are finding patterns that may help guide eDNA-based biomonitoring.
Climate change is leading to habitat shifts that threaten species persistence throughout California's unique ecosystems. Baseline biodiversity data would provide opportunities for habitats to be managed under short-term and long-term environmental change. Aiming to provide biodiversity data, the UC Conservation Genomics Consortium launched the California Environmental DNA (CALeDNA) program to be a citizen and community science biomonitoring initiative that uses environmental DNA (eDNA, DNA shed from organisms such as from fur, feces, spores, pollen or leaves). Now with results from 1,000 samples shared online, California biodiversity patterns are discoverable. Soil, sediment and water collected by researchers, undergraduates and the public reveal a new catalog of thousands of organisms that only slightly overlap with traditional survey bioinventories. The CALeDNA website lets users explore the taxonomic diversity in different ways, and researchers have created tools to help people new to eDNA to analyze community ecology patterns. Although eDNA results are not always precise, the program team is making progress to fit it into California's biodiversity management toolbox, such as for monitoring ecosystem recovery after invasive species removal or wildfire.
4-H youth advance biosecurity at home and in their communities
by Martin H. Smith, Woutrina A. Smith, Cheryl L. Meehan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yuba-Sutter youth successfully completed the 4-H Bio-Security Proficiencies Program and effected change as community science experts.

Youth participants in 4-H animal science projects are involved extensively with raising and exhibiting agricultural animals, often on backyard farms (Smith and Meehan 2012). Since backyard farms can serve as sources and vectors of pathogens (FAO 1999; WHO 2011), it is critical that 4-H youth take an active role in preventing the introduction and spread of economically important animal diseases. Fifteen 4-H youth from two counties in California participated in the 4-H Bio-Security Proficiencies Program, a long-term community and citizen science project focused on animal and zoonotic disease risk education and mitigation. Then, in the role of community science experts, they acted upon the risk assessments and mitigation plans they had developed to improve biosecurity practices and reduce the likelihood of disease spread on their home premises and at their local county fair. They also extended their knowledge to the broader livestock exhibition community through outreach videos.  

Engaging the importance of community scientists in the management of an invasive marine pest
by Edwin Grosholz, Sabrina Drill, Linda McCann, Kate Bimrose
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sustainable management of a nonnative predatory crab in a coastal lagoon in Northern California succeeded due to the involvement of community scientists.
The introduction of nonnative invasive pests is among the many threats facing coastal ecosystems worldwide. Managing these pests often requires considerable effort and resources, and community scientists can be essential for providing the capacity needed for management and monitoring activities. In response to the invasion of a Northern California estuary by the predatory European green crab, a collaborative team of academic researchers and community scientists initiated a local eradication program. The green crab is listed among the world's 100 worst invaders, and threatened both native species and commercial shellfisheries. The program dramatically reduced the green crab population over a 5-year period, but it rebounded, which necessitated a switch in project goals from eradication to population suppression. Community scientists were essential for facilitating this switch by providing the necessary capacity to quantify population characteristics and maintain reduced crab populations. The result was a sustainable program that successfully maintained low green crab densities, which will likely improve habitat for native species.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 75, No.1

Cover: 

Students at the Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History (a California Naturalist Partner) participating in a coastal LiMPETS (Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students) survey. Photo by Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History.

Special Issue
Community and citizen science
January-March 2021
Volume 75, Number 1
EDITORIAL
Community and citizen science: Inviting the public into UC ANR research
by Glenda Humiston
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Community and citizen science fosters an appreciation for the scientific process, building scientific literacy and public support for research.
INTRODUCTION
Special issue: Community and citizen science
by Ryan Meyer, Sabrina Drill, Christopher Jadallah
Full text HTML  | PDF  
In this special issue, California Agriculture presents research and news on community and citizen science projects across California.
NEWS
Report: Assessing community and citizen science at UC ANR
by Ryan Meyer, Sabrina Drill
Full text HTML  | PDF  
The authors uncovered a rich diversity of projects that engage Californians in UC ANR research, and a variety of challenges and opportunities for expanding this work.
NEWS
Community and citizen science projects around UC ANR
by Lucien Crowder
Full text HTML  | PDF  
What do coyotes, eggs and leafy greens have in common? They're all subjects of UC ANR research projects to which everyday Californians have contributed.

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Data parties engage 4-H volunteers in data interpretation, strengthening camp programs and evaluation process
by Marianne Bird, Kendra M. Lewis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A practice associated with citizen science allows 4-H stakeholders to better engage in program evaluation.
Participatory evaluation is a form of citizen science that brings program stakeholders into partnership with researchers to increase the understanding and value that evaluation provides. For the last four years, 4-H volunteers and staff have joined academics to assess the impact of the California 4-H camping program on youth and teen leaders in areas such as responsibility, confidence and leadership. Volunteers and nonacademic staff in the field informed the design of this multiyear impact study, collected data and engaged in data interpretation through “data parties.” In a follow-up evaluation of the data parties, we found that those who participated reported deeper understanding of and buy-in to the data. Participants also provided the research team insights into findings. By detailing the California 4-H Camp Evaluation case study, this paper describes the mutual benefits that accrue to researchers and volunteers when, through data parties, they investigate findings together.
The CALeDNA program: Citizen scientists and researchers inventory California's biodiversity
by Rachel S. Meyer, Miroslava Munguia Ramos, Meixi Lin, Teia M. Schweizer, Zachary Gold, Dannise Ruiz Ramos, Sabrina Shirazi, Gaurav Kandlikar, Wai-Yin Kwan, Emily E. Curd, Amanda Freise, Jordan Moberg Parker, Jason P. Sexton, Regina Wetzer, N. Dean Pentcheff, Adam R. Wall, Lenore Pipes, Ana Garcia-Vedrenne, Maura Palacios Mejia, Tiara Moore, Chloe Orland, Kimberly M. Ballare, Anna Worth, Eric Beraut, Emma L. Aronson, Rasmus Nielsen, Harris A. Lewin, Paul H. Barber, Jeff Wall, Nathan Kraft, Beth Shapiro, Robert K. Wayne
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
By connecting different grassroots eDNA projects, and making data open to explore, we are finding patterns that may help guide eDNA-based biomonitoring.
Climate change is leading to habitat shifts that threaten species persistence throughout California's unique ecosystems. Baseline biodiversity data would provide opportunities for habitats to be managed under short-term and long-term environmental change. Aiming to provide biodiversity data, the UC Conservation Genomics Consortium launched the California Environmental DNA (CALeDNA) program to be a citizen and community science biomonitoring initiative that uses environmental DNA (eDNA, DNA shed from organisms such as from fur, feces, spores, pollen or leaves). Now with results from 1,000 samples shared online, California biodiversity patterns are discoverable. Soil, sediment and water collected by researchers, undergraduates and the public reveal a new catalog of thousands of organisms that only slightly overlap with traditional survey bioinventories. The CALeDNA website lets users explore the taxonomic diversity in different ways, and researchers have created tools to help people new to eDNA to analyze community ecology patterns. Although eDNA results are not always precise, the program team is making progress to fit it into California's biodiversity management toolbox, such as for monitoring ecosystem recovery after invasive species removal or wildfire.
4-H youth advance biosecurity at home and in their communities
by Martin H. Smith, Woutrina A. Smith, Cheryl L. Meehan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Yuba-Sutter youth successfully completed the 4-H Bio-Security Proficiencies Program and effected change as community science experts.

Youth participants in 4-H animal science projects are involved extensively with raising and exhibiting agricultural animals, often on backyard farms (Smith and Meehan 2012). Since backyard farms can serve as sources and vectors of pathogens (FAO 1999; WHO 2011), it is critical that 4-H youth take an active role in preventing the introduction and spread of economically important animal diseases. Fifteen 4-H youth from two counties in California participated in the 4-H Bio-Security Proficiencies Program, a long-term community and citizen science project focused on animal and zoonotic disease risk education and mitigation. Then, in the role of community science experts, they acted upon the risk assessments and mitigation plans they had developed to improve biosecurity practices and reduce the likelihood of disease spread on their home premises and at their local county fair. They also extended their knowledge to the broader livestock exhibition community through outreach videos.  

Engaging the importance of community scientists in the management of an invasive marine pest
by Edwin Grosholz, Sabrina Drill, Linda McCann, Kate Bimrose
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sustainable management of a nonnative predatory crab in a coastal lagoon in Northern California succeeded due to the involvement of community scientists.
The introduction of nonnative invasive pests is among the many threats facing coastal ecosystems worldwide. Managing these pests often requires considerable effort and resources, and community scientists can be essential for providing the capacity needed for management and monitoring activities. In response to the invasion of a Northern California estuary by the predatory European green crab, a collaborative team of academic researchers and community scientists initiated a local eradication program. The green crab is listed among the world's 100 worst invaders, and threatened both native species and commercial shellfisheries. The program dramatically reduced the green crab population over a 5-year period, but it rebounded, which necessitated a switch in project goals from eradication to population suppression. Community scientists were essential for facilitating this switch by providing the necessary capacity to quantify population characteristics and maintain reduced crab populations. The result was a sustainable program that successfully maintained low green crab densities, which will likely improve habitat for native species.

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