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California Agriculture, Vol. 24, No.6

Cover:  Ponderosu Pine test plot in the Coast Range, Lake County, was thinned in 1952 and has shown no forest debris accumulation since then.
June 1970
Volume 24, Number 6

Research articles

Rice introductions tested for use in California
by W. F. Lehman, M. L. Peterson, C. R. Adair, L. L. Davis, R. W. Haubrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: CALIFORNIA RICE GROWERS adopted an accelerated research program in 1969, based on recommendations of a rice industry committee. The basic objectives of the industry-sponsored program are to provide improved varieties, new production technology, and marketing information which will enable rice growers to remain competitive in domestic and world markets. The research program involves utilization of the expanded research facilities at the industry-owned and operated Rice Experiment Station at Biggs, plus the recently developed supplementary rice research resources of the University of California at Davis, and at the Imperial Valley Field Station, El Centre Research is already underway toward the development of better California varieties with fewer crop residue management problems.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: CALIFORNIA RICE GROWERS adopted an accelerated research program in 1969, based on recommendations of a rice industry committee. The basic objectives of the industry-sponsored program are to provide improved varieties, new production technology, and marketing information which will enable rice growers to remain competitive in domestic and world markets. The research program involves utilization of the expanded research facilities at the industry-owned and operated Rice Experiment Station at Biggs, plus the recently developed supplementary rice research resources of the University of California at Davis, and at the Imperial Valley Field Station, El Centre Research is already underway toward the development of better California varieties with fewer crop residue management problems.
Debris accumulation in a ponderosa pine forest
by James K. Agee, Harold H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These results indicate that thinning, with subsequent slash removal, will diminish the rate of debris accumulation for at least 20 years—facilitating maintenance of low fire hazards, and easing the problems of multiple-use forest management.
These results indicate that thinning, with subsequent slash removal, will diminish the rate of debris accumulation for at least 20 years—facilitating maintenance of low fire hazards, and easing the problems of multiple-use forest management.
Progress report, 1969… whitewash trials in walnuts
by F. J. Perry, A. D. Rizzi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: WHITEWASH SPRAYS were found beneficial to walnuts in studies conducted during the early 1960's. Sunburn injury to exposed nuts and limbs was reduced with applications of various types of whitewash sprays. Internal temperatures of exposed nuts averaged 2 to 3 degrees lower on whitewashed trees than the unsprayed checks, and there was a greater percentage of large sound nuts on sprayed trees than on unsprayed trees. Only slight differences in kernel color were reported in these early trials. A good whitewash cover on the trees was needed for results.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: WHITEWASH SPRAYS were found beneficial to walnuts in studies conducted during the early 1960's. Sunburn injury to exposed nuts and limbs was reduced with applications of various types of whitewash sprays. Internal temperatures of exposed nuts averaged 2 to 3 degrees lower on whitewashed trees than the unsprayed checks, and there was a greater percentage of large sound nuts on sprayed trees than on unsprayed trees. Only slight differences in kernel color were reported in these early trials. A good whitewash cover on the trees was needed for results.
Effects of nitrogen on nodulation and yield of irrigated soybeans
by R. M. Hoover, B. H. Beard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A complex relationship exists between the soybean plant and symbiotic Rhizobium. The multiplication of the Rhizobium is dependent on the nitrogen fertility of the soil. On the other hand, the soybean plant can apparently use either nitrogen from the soil or that fixed by bacteria. However, a temporary shortage of nitrogen causing chlorosis did not affect yields in this study. When nitrogen became available later in the season the soybean plant was able to attain the same yield potential.
A complex relationship exists between the soybean plant and symbiotic Rhizobium. The multiplication of the Rhizobium is dependent on the nitrogen fertility of the soil. On the other hand, the soybean plant can apparently use either nitrogen from the soil or that fixed by bacteria. However, a temporary shortage of nitrogen causing chlorosis did not affect yields in this study. When nitrogen became available later in the season the soybean plant was able to attain the same yield potential.
Factors injecting effectiveness of two surfactants on water-repellent soils
by M. A. Mustafa, J. Letey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: WATER-REPELLENT soils are characterized by two undesirable physical properties: low water infiltration rate, and high runoff. Such soils have been reported in many parts of the world under various conditions, however, one of California's real practical problems involves soil-water repellency occurring on burned water-sheds. A high percentage of the many acres (primarily in southern California) burned over by wildfires every year includes soils which repel water. The combination of removing protective vegetation, and inducing water repellency causes an extreme erosion hazard.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: WATER-REPELLENT soils are characterized by two undesirable physical properties: low water infiltration rate, and high runoff. Such soils have been reported in many parts of the world under various conditions, however, one of California's real practical problems involves soil-water repellency occurring on burned water-sheds. A high percentage of the many acres (primarily in southern California) burned over by wildfires every year includes soils which repel water. The combination of removing protective vegetation, and inducing water repellency causes an extreme erosion hazard.
Distribution of pear decline virus in California orchards
by J. F. Doyle, H. J. O'reilly, G. Nyland, B. Bearden, R. Bethell, C. Hemstreet, G. Morehead, S. Sibbett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pear decline virus is present in both healthy and weak appearing pear trees on all common rootstocks in commercial orchards in California. Vigorous condition of any tree probably results from true tolerance of the rootstock to the disease rather than the chance that it may have escaped infection. Research suggests a possible relationship between pear leaf curl and pear decline.
Pear decline virus is present in both healthy and weak appearing pear trees on all common rootstocks in commercial orchards in California. Vigorous condition of any tree probably results from true tolerance of the rootstock to the disease rather than the chance that it may have escaped infection. Research suggests a possible relationship between pear leaf curl and pear decline.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Nutritional my speaking… were great producers, but poor communicators
by Jerry Lester
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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California Agriculture, Vol. 24, No.6

Cover:  Ponderosu Pine test plot in the Coast Range, Lake County, was thinned in 1952 and has shown no forest debris accumulation since then.
June 1970
Volume 24, Number 6

Research articles

Rice introductions tested for use in California
by W. F. Lehman, M. L. Peterson, C. R. Adair, L. L. Davis, R. W. Haubrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: CALIFORNIA RICE GROWERS adopted an accelerated research program in 1969, based on recommendations of a rice industry committee. The basic objectives of the industry-sponsored program are to provide improved varieties, new production technology, and marketing information which will enable rice growers to remain competitive in domestic and world markets. The research program involves utilization of the expanded research facilities at the industry-owned and operated Rice Experiment Station at Biggs, plus the recently developed supplementary rice research resources of the University of California at Davis, and at the Imperial Valley Field Station, El Centre Research is already underway toward the development of better California varieties with fewer crop residue management problems.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: CALIFORNIA RICE GROWERS adopted an accelerated research program in 1969, based on recommendations of a rice industry committee. The basic objectives of the industry-sponsored program are to provide improved varieties, new production technology, and marketing information which will enable rice growers to remain competitive in domestic and world markets. The research program involves utilization of the expanded research facilities at the industry-owned and operated Rice Experiment Station at Biggs, plus the recently developed supplementary rice research resources of the University of California at Davis, and at the Imperial Valley Field Station, El Centre Research is already underway toward the development of better California varieties with fewer crop residue management problems.
Debris accumulation in a ponderosa pine forest
by James K. Agee, Harold H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These results indicate that thinning, with subsequent slash removal, will diminish the rate of debris accumulation for at least 20 years—facilitating maintenance of low fire hazards, and easing the problems of multiple-use forest management.
These results indicate that thinning, with subsequent slash removal, will diminish the rate of debris accumulation for at least 20 years—facilitating maintenance of low fire hazards, and easing the problems of multiple-use forest management.
Progress report, 1969… whitewash trials in walnuts
by F. J. Perry, A. D. Rizzi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: WHITEWASH SPRAYS were found beneficial to walnuts in studies conducted during the early 1960's. Sunburn injury to exposed nuts and limbs was reduced with applications of various types of whitewash sprays. Internal temperatures of exposed nuts averaged 2 to 3 degrees lower on whitewashed trees than the unsprayed checks, and there was a greater percentage of large sound nuts on sprayed trees than on unsprayed trees. Only slight differences in kernel color were reported in these early trials. A good whitewash cover on the trees was needed for results.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: WHITEWASH SPRAYS were found beneficial to walnuts in studies conducted during the early 1960's. Sunburn injury to exposed nuts and limbs was reduced with applications of various types of whitewash sprays. Internal temperatures of exposed nuts averaged 2 to 3 degrees lower on whitewashed trees than the unsprayed checks, and there was a greater percentage of large sound nuts on sprayed trees than on unsprayed trees. Only slight differences in kernel color were reported in these early trials. A good whitewash cover on the trees was needed for results.
Effects of nitrogen on nodulation and yield of irrigated soybeans
by R. M. Hoover, B. H. Beard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A complex relationship exists between the soybean plant and symbiotic Rhizobium. The multiplication of the Rhizobium is dependent on the nitrogen fertility of the soil. On the other hand, the soybean plant can apparently use either nitrogen from the soil or that fixed by bacteria. However, a temporary shortage of nitrogen causing chlorosis did not affect yields in this study. When nitrogen became available later in the season the soybean plant was able to attain the same yield potential.
A complex relationship exists between the soybean plant and symbiotic Rhizobium. The multiplication of the Rhizobium is dependent on the nitrogen fertility of the soil. On the other hand, the soybean plant can apparently use either nitrogen from the soil or that fixed by bacteria. However, a temporary shortage of nitrogen causing chlorosis did not affect yields in this study. When nitrogen became available later in the season the soybean plant was able to attain the same yield potential.
Factors injecting effectiveness of two surfactants on water-repellent soils
by M. A. Mustafa, J. Letey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: WATER-REPELLENT soils are characterized by two undesirable physical properties: low water infiltration rate, and high runoff. Such soils have been reported in many parts of the world under various conditions, however, one of California's real practical problems involves soil-water repellency occurring on burned water-sheds. A high percentage of the many acres (primarily in southern California) burned over by wildfires every year includes soils which repel water. The combination of removing protective vegetation, and inducing water repellency causes an extreme erosion hazard.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: WATER-REPELLENT soils are characterized by two undesirable physical properties: low water infiltration rate, and high runoff. Such soils have been reported in many parts of the world under various conditions, however, one of California's real practical problems involves soil-water repellency occurring on burned water-sheds. A high percentage of the many acres (primarily in southern California) burned over by wildfires every year includes soils which repel water. The combination of removing protective vegetation, and inducing water repellency causes an extreme erosion hazard.
Distribution of pear decline virus in California orchards
by J. F. Doyle, H. J. O'reilly, G. Nyland, B. Bearden, R. Bethell, C. Hemstreet, G. Morehead, S. Sibbett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pear decline virus is present in both healthy and weak appearing pear trees on all common rootstocks in commercial orchards in California. Vigorous condition of any tree probably results from true tolerance of the rootstock to the disease rather than the chance that it may have escaped infection. Research suggests a possible relationship between pear leaf curl and pear decline.
Pear decline virus is present in both healthy and weak appearing pear trees on all common rootstocks in commercial orchards in California. Vigorous condition of any tree probably results from true tolerance of the rootstock to the disease rather than the chance that it may have escaped infection. Research suggests a possible relationship between pear leaf curl and pear decline.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Nutritional my speaking… were great producers, but poor communicators
by Jerry Lester
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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