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Tahoe research partnership created

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California Agriculture 53(5):4-4.

Published September 01, 1999

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A historic partnership has been reached among research institutions and local and federal agencies to advance research in the Lake Tahoe basin.

The new agreement is intended to help researchers and agencies work together to preserve and restore the Sierra Nevada crown jewel. While much is known about the increasing algal growth, declining clarity and influences of development on the lake's watershed, further coordinated scientific inquiry into such areas as watershed repair and air quality is vital, say agreement co-signers.

The memorandum of understanding between the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency and a host of federal agencies and research institutions will coordinate the collection and sharing of data.

Those signing the memorandum with the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency include UC Davis; U.S. Geological Survey; University of Nevada, Reno; Desert Research Institute; and the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station.

Estrogen-resistant strains of mice show normal sperm maturation following exposure to high (40μg) doses of estrogen. Note mature elongated spermatids (nearly mature sperm) in the center of this seminiferous tubule.

Estrogen-resistant strains of mice show normal sperm maturation following exposure to high (40μg) doses of estrogen. Note mature elongated spermatids (nearly mature sperm) in the center of this seminiferous tubule.

Estrogen-sensitive strains of mice showed disruption of testicular development and sperm maturation by even the lowest doses of estrogen (2.5μg). Note the small, disrupted seminiferous tubules lacking elongated spermatids.

Estrogen-sensitive strains of mice showed disruption of testicular development and sperm maturation by even the lowest doses of estrogen (2.5μg). Note the small, disrupted seminiferous tubules lacking elongated spermatids.

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Tahoe research partnership created

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Tahoe research partnership created

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Editors

Publication Information

California Agriculture 53(5):4-4.

Published September 01, 1999

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Full text

A historic partnership has been reached among research institutions and local and federal agencies to advance research in the Lake Tahoe basin.

The new agreement is intended to help researchers and agencies work together to preserve and restore the Sierra Nevada crown jewel. While much is known about the increasing algal growth, declining clarity and influences of development on the lake's watershed, further coordinated scientific inquiry into such areas as watershed repair and air quality is vital, say agreement co-signers.

The memorandum of understanding between the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency and a host of federal agencies and research institutions will coordinate the collection and sharing of data.

Those signing the memorandum with the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency include UC Davis; U.S. Geological Survey; University of Nevada, Reno; Desert Research Institute; and the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station.

Estrogen-resistant strains of mice show normal sperm maturation following exposure to high (40μg) doses of estrogen. Note mature elongated spermatids (nearly mature sperm) in the center of this seminiferous tubule.

Estrogen-resistant strains of mice show normal sperm maturation following exposure to high (40μg) doses of estrogen. Note mature elongated spermatids (nearly mature sperm) in the center of this seminiferous tubule.

Estrogen-sensitive strains of mice showed disruption of testicular development and sperm maturation by even the lowest doses of estrogen (2.5μg). Note the small, disrupted seminiferous tubules lacking elongated spermatids.

Estrogen-sensitive strains of mice showed disruption of testicular development and sperm maturation by even the lowest doses of estrogen (2.5μg). Note the small, disrupted seminiferous tubules lacking elongated spermatids.

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