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Carbamate herbicides—new tools for cytological studies

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Authors

W. B. Storey, University of California
L. S. Jordan, University of California
J. D. Mann, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 22(8):12-13.

Published August 01, 1968

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Abstract

Cytology (the branch of biology dealing with studies of cell structure and function under the microscope) is important to both plant and animal scientists, because cytological studies disclose useful information on cell organization and behavior under both normal and artificially induced conditions. Plant physiologists in the Department of Horticultural Science, Riverside, are actively engaged in research on herbicides, with special emphasis on selective elimination of weeds from plantings of crop plants. In some experiments, the effects of herbicides become immediately apparent in either the weeds or the crop plants, or in both. In other experiments, damage to both weeds and crop plants remains concealed for a long time before it becomes evident. Such variable and often unpredictable behavior explains the interest of weed control physiologists in the mode of action of selective herbicides upon the species under study. One of the more promising approaches to mode-of-action studies is the cytological examination of herbicidal effects upon individual cells, especially dividing cells in root tissues.

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Carbamate herbicides—new tools for cytological studies

W. B. Storey, L. S. Jordan, J. D. Mann
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Carbamate herbicides—new tools for cytological studies

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. B. Storey, University of California
L. S. Jordan, University of California
J. D. Mann, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 22(8):12-13.

Published August 01, 1968

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Cytology (the branch of biology dealing with studies of cell structure and function under the microscope) is important to both plant and animal scientists, because cytological studies disclose useful information on cell organization and behavior under both normal and artificially induced conditions. Plant physiologists in the Department of Horticultural Science, Riverside, are actively engaged in research on herbicides, with special emphasis on selective elimination of weeds from plantings of crop plants. In some experiments, the effects of herbicides become immediately apparent in either the weeds or the crop plants, or in both. In other experiments, damage to both weeds and crop plants remains concealed for a long time before it becomes evident. Such variable and often unpredictable behavior explains the interest of weed control physiologists in the mode of action of selective herbicides upon the species under study. One of the more promising approaches to mode-of-action studies is the cytological examination of herbicidal effects upon individual cells, especially dividing cells in root tissues.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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