California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Supplemental feeding of honey bees

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Authors

Bob Sheesley, University of California
Bernard Poduska

Publication Information

California Agriculture 22(7):2-4.

Published July 01, 1968

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Abstract

These results indicate that ratings of honey bee colonies based on bee numbers and brood area, were most useful in predicting the pollen-collecting activity by those colonies when the rating was done within 21 days, or one brood cycle, of the pollination period. The rating criteria correlated closely with the pollen collection of honey bees in this experiment. The results of this experiment demonstrated that tools are available now for stimulating an increase in honey bee populations, and for estimating relative pollination capabilities of bee colonies. The advisability and methods of use rest in the hands and imaginations of beekeepers and growers of bee-pollinated crops.

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Supplemental feeding of honey bees

Bob Sheesley, Bernard Poduska
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Supplemental feeding of honey bees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Bob Sheesley, University of California
Bernard Poduska

Publication Information

California Agriculture 22(7):2-4.

Published July 01, 1968

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

These results indicate that ratings of honey bee colonies based on bee numbers and brood area, were most useful in predicting the pollen-collecting activity by those colonies when the rating was done within 21 days, or one brood cycle, of the pollination period. The rating criteria correlated closely with the pollen collection of honey bees in this experiment. The results of this experiment demonstrated that tools are available now for stimulating an increase in honey bee populations, and for estimating relative pollination capabilities of bee colonies. The advisability and methods of use rest in the hands and imaginations of beekeepers and growers of bee-pollinated crops.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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