California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

A comparison of deep and shallow drain tile for reduction of soil salinity in Imperial Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. E. Robinson
J. N. Luthin, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(2):2-4.

Published February 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

In these tests, more salt was removed per unit of time by constant flooding than with intermittent flooding — indicating this treatment would be preferred where land values are higher or water is inexpensive. However, intermittent irrigation removed more salt per unit of water applied—indicating that where water is expensive, or land values low, this would be the better treatment. The shallow tile increased the rate of salt removal from the first and fourth foot of soil in the intermittent treatment, and for all depths except the fourth foot, under the constant flooding treatment. For soils having a less permeable layer at shallow depths, the use of shallow drain lines in addition to deep lines will increase the leaching of the soil and will help salinity control.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

A comparison of deep and shallow drain tile for reduction of soil salinity in Imperial Valley

F. E. Robinson, J. N. Luthin
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

A comparison of deep and shallow drain tile for reduction of soil salinity in Imperial Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. E. Robinson
J. N. Luthin, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 21(2):2-4.

Published February 01, 1967

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

In these tests, more salt was removed per unit of time by constant flooding than with intermittent flooding — indicating this treatment would be preferred where land values are higher or water is inexpensive. However, intermittent irrigation removed more salt per unit of water applied—indicating that where water is expensive, or land values low, this would be the better treatment. The shallow tile increased the rate of salt removal from the first and fourth foot of soil in the intermittent treatment, and for all depths except the fourth foot, under the constant flooding treatment. For soils having a less permeable layer at shallow depths, the use of shallow drain lines in addition to deep lines will increase the leaching of the soil and will help salinity control.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu