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Easter lilies grow taller at closer spacing

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Authors

Harry C. Kohl, University of California, Davis
R. L. Nelson, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(9):4-4.

Published September 01, 1966

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Abstract

It has been observed in previous studies that Easter lilies grow taller at lower light intensities. From data recently collected at the Los Angeles campus, it was also found that closer spacing is equivalent to lower light intensity insofar as height is concerned. The data summarized in the graph indicate that plants from commercial-size bulbs were of minimum height when 100 sq inches or more were allowed per plant. At higher light intensities, this critical value would be expected to be lower and at lower intensities, higher.–Harry C. Kohl, Jr., and R. L. Nelson, Department of Landscape Horticulture, University of California, Davis.

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Easter lilies grow taller at closer spacing

Harry C. Kohl, R. L. Nelson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Easter lilies grow taller at closer spacing

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Harry C. Kohl, University of California, Davis
R. L. Nelson, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(9):4-4.

Published September 01, 1966

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

It has been observed in previous studies that Easter lilies grow taller at lower light intensities. From data recently collected at the Los Angeles campus, it was also found that closer spacing is equivalent to lower light intensity insofar as height is concerned. The data summarized in the graph indicate that plants from commercial-size bulbs were of minimum height when 100 sq inches or more were allowed per plant. At higher light intensities, this critical value would be expected to be lower and at lower intensities, higher.–Harry C. Kohl, Jr., and R. L. Nelson, Department of Landscape Horticulture, University of California, Davis.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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