California Agriculture
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California Agriculture
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Low holding temperatures still vital with rapid marketing of strawberries

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Authors

F. G. Mitchell, University of California
E. C. Maxie, University of California
Gene Mayer, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(3):13-14.

Published March 01, 1966

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Abstract

Air transit is greatly reducing the marketing period for much of California's strawberry crop. However, low holding temperatures were still found important for strawberries—even when they are consumed within two or three days of harvest. Constant low holding temperatures provided the greatest protection, and any warming was detrimental to fruit quality. Total deterioration was related to the total length of time fruit was exposed to warm temperatures, regardless of the pattern of exposure. Rewarming of fruit after cooling did not accelerate the rate of deterioration, as compared with fruit held at a constant warm temperature.

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Low holding temperatures still vital with rapid marketing of strawberries

F. G. Mitchell, E. C. Maxie, Gene Mayer
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Low holding temperatures still vital with rapid marketing of strawberries

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. G. Mitchell, University of California
E. C. Maxie, University of California
Gene Mayer, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(3):13-14.

Published March 01, 1966

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Air transit is greatly reducing the marketing period for much of California's strawberry crop. However, low holding temperatures were still found important for strawberries—even when they are consumed within two or three days of harvest. Constant low holding temperatures provided the greatest protection, and any warming was detrimental to fruit quality. Total deterioration was related to the total length of time fruit was exposed to warm temperatures, regardless of the pattern of exposure. Rewarming of fruit after cooling did not accelerate the rate of deterioration, as compared with fruit held at a constant warm temperature.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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