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A progress review…: The cotton variety improvement program

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Authors

John H. Turner, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(12):6-7.

Published December 01, 1965

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Abstract

The U. S. Cotton Research Station at Shafter is the focal point for research on cotton variety improvement by USDA researchers with the cooperation of University scientists. This continually expanding research has already improved techniques for testing and seed multiplication, widened the genetic base of the material being used, increased yield and quality of Acala 4–42, and developed new Acala strains. Future basic research in genetics, breeding methodology, and gene transfer phases is aimed at reducing costs for producers and transforming California cotton fields into efficient, factory-like operations.

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A progress review…: The cotton variety improvement program

John H. Turner
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

A progress review…: The cotton variety improvement program

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

John H. Turner, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(12):6-7.

Published December 01, 1965

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The U. S. Cotton Research Station at Shafter is the focal point for research on cotton variety improvement by USDA researchers with the cooperation of University scientists. This continually expanding research has already improved techniques for testing and seed multiplication, widened the genetic base of the material being used, increased yield and quality of Acala 4–42, and developed new Acala strains. Future basic research in genetics, breeding methodology, and gene transfer phases is aimed at reducing costs for producers and transforming California cotton fields into efficient, factory-like operations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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