California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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Propagation of california wax myrtle: …A valuable native shrub or tree for highway landscaping

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Authors

R. M. Sachs, University of California
J. Debie, University of California
R. W. Isle, Mendocino County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(12):10-11.

Published December 01, 1965

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Abstract

California Wax Myrtle, recently selected for testing along highways, is not propagated commercially; hence, performance trials with this species have lagged because of inadequate numbers of plants. Results of research reported here show that rooting of cuttings is greatly dependent upon the nature of the cutting material and time of year at which cuttings are taken. Up to 80% rooting has been achieved at U. C., Davis, using softwood cuttings taken in April, and applying mist-propagation techniques for two to three months. Rooting percentages are generally increased by treatment with indolebutyric acid (0.8% in a talc preparation).

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Propagation of california wax myrtle: …A valuable native shrub or tree for highway landscaping

R. M. Sachs, J. Debie, R. W. Isle
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Propagation of california wax myrtle: …A valuable native shrub or tree for highway landscaping

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. M. Sachs, University of California
J. Debie, University of California
R. W. Isle, Mendocino County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(12):10-11.

Published December 01, 1965

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

California Wax Myrtle, recently selected for testing along highways, is not propagated commercially; hence, performance trials with this species have lagged because of inadequate numbers of plants. Results of research reported here show that rooting of cuttings is greatly dependent upon the nature of the cutting material and time of year at which cuttings are taken. Up to 80% rooting has been achieved at U. C., Davis, using softwood cuttings taken in April, and applying mist-propagation techniques for two to three months. Rooting percentages are generally increased by treatment with indolebutyric acid (0.8% in a talc preparation).

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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