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California Agriculture
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California Land Conservation Act of 1965: …

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Authors

J. H. Snyder, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(9):3-4.

Published September 01, 1965

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Abstract

Voluntary contracts regulating nonagricultural development rights are the heart of the California Land Conservation Act of 1965. Designed to answer some of the criticism of previous land-control devices, the new law should help solve some of the serious problems of population growth and urbanization facing California. The legislation calls for a minimum ten-year period during which the property owner surrenders his nonagricultural development rights; and the local government—presumably the county—acquires those rights in the nature of a trusteeship. The local government will receive a state subvention payment, and the property owners who enter into contracts may receive compensation from the local government.

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Author notes

He has served as a member of the Advisory Committee to the Assembly Interim Committee on agriculture since its formation in April, 1964.

California Land Conservation Act of 1965: …

J. H. Snyder
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

California Land Conservation Act of 1965: …

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. H. Snyder, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 19(9):3-4.

Published September 01, 1965

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Voluntary contracts regulating nonagricultural development rights are the heart of the California Land Conservation Act of 1965. Designed to answer some of the criticism of previous land-control devices, the new law should help solve some of the serious problems of population growth and urbanization facing California. The legislation calls for a minimum ten-year period during which the property owner surrenders his nonagricultural development rights; and the local government—presumably the county—acquires those rights in the nature of a trusteeship. The local government will receive a state subvention payment, and the property owners who enter into contracts may receive compensation from the local government.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

He has served as a member of the Advisory Committee to the Assembly Interim Committee on agriculture since its formation in April, 1964.


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