California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

New alfalfa variety resists spotted aphids and produces high yields: Sonora

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. F. Lehman, University of California
E. H. Stanford
V. L. Marble
W. H. Isom

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(6):8-9.

Published June 01, 1963

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Since 1954, the spotted alfalfa aphid has severely damaged alfalfa in California, Arizona, and Nevada. Plant breeders and entomologists from all three states have worked to develop Sonora—a new variety, resistant to the aphid and high producing, particularly in winter and early spring. The purple-flowered, upright-growing Sonora recovers rapidly after cutting and is adapted to areas of the Southwest, formerly planted to African, where winter forage production is desired.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

New alfalfa variety resists spotted aphids and produces high yields: Sonora

W. F. Lehman, E. H. Stanford, V. L. Marble, W. H. Isom
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

New alfalfa variety resists spotted aphids and produces high yields: Sonora

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. F. Lehman, University of California
E. H. Stanford
V. L. Marble
W. H. Isom

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(6):8-9.

Published June 01, 1963

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Since 1954, the spotted alfalfa aphid has severely damaged alfalfa in California, Arizona, and Nevada. Plant breeders and entomologists from all three states have worked to develop Sonora—a new variety, resistant to the aphid and high producing, particularly in winter and early spring. The purple-flowered, upright-growing Sonora recovers rapidly after cutting and is adapted to areas of the Southwest, formerly planted to African, where winter forage production is desired.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu