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Chili pepper production: Possibilities encouraging in Kern County trials

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Authors

L. F. Lippert, University of California
J. C. Bishop, USDA Cotton Research Station
R. M. Arms, Kern County Land Company

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(6):12-12.

Published June 01, 1963

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Abstract

THE IMPORTANT DEHYDRATING chili pepper industry in California is located in the coastal counties from Santa Maria to San Diego. The loss of agricultural acreage in these areas is necessitating a search for new areas of production. Inland valleys of central and southern California offer extensive acreages for this crop, but differ from coastal climates by higher summer temperatures and shorter growing seasons.

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Author notes

C. A. Taylor and W. A. Nicholson, Chili Products Corporation, Los Angeles, assisted with pungency determinations.

Chili pepper production: Possibilities encouraging in Kern County trials

L. F. Lippert, J. C. Bishop, R. M. Arms
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chili pepper production: Possibilities encouraging in Kern County trials

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

L. F. Lippert, University of California
J. C. Bishop, USDA Cotton Research Station
R. M. Arms, Kern County Land Company

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(6):12-12.

Published June 01, 1963

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

THE IMPORTANT DEHYDRATING chili pepper industry in California is located in the coastal counties from Santa Maria to San Diego. The loss of agricultural acreage in these areas is necessitating a search for new areas of production. Inland valleys of central and southern California offer extensive acreages for this crop, but differ from coastal climates by higher summer temperatures and shorter growing seasons.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

C. A. Taylor and W. A. Nicholson, Chili Products Corporation, Los Angeles, assisted with pungency determinations.


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