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Lithium in California's water resources

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Authors

Gordon R. Bradford, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(5):6-8.

Published May 01, 1963

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Abstract

Of 400 samples representative of water resources in California, 25% were found to contain toxic levels of lithium, capable of adversely affecting the growth of citrus and other crops. Water samples with a high lithium content were usually associated with low magnesium and/or a high sodium percentage. Because of the natural occurrences of toxic levels of lithium in irrigation water, as well as possible contamination from industrial uses of lithium compounds, agencies responsible for maintaining water quality standards should also include analysis for lithium along with their routine sampling.

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Author notes

David L. Shatto, Assistant Public Health Chemist with the State Department of Water Resources Laboratory at Riverside, made available analytical data, maps, etc., which assisted in the preparation of this report.

Lithium in California's water resources

Gordon R. Bradford
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Lithium in California's water resources

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Gordon R. Bradford, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(5):6-8.

Published May 01, 1963

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Of 400 samples representative of water resources in California, 25% were found to contain toxic levels of lithium, capable of adversely affecting the growth of citrus and other crops. Water samples with a high lithium content were usually associated with low magnesium and/or a high sodium percentage. Because of the natural occurrences of toxic levels of lithium in irrigation water, as well as possible contamination from industrial uses of lithium compounds, agencies responsible for maintaining water quality standards should also include analysis for lithium along with their routine sampling.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

David L. Shatto, Assistant Public Health Chemist with the State Department of Water Resources Laboratory at Riverside, made available analytical data, maps, etc., which assisted in the preparation of this report.


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