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California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Cotton breeding progress continues

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Authors

John H. Turner, U.S. Cotton Research Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(2):7-7.

Published February 01, 1962

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Abstract

San Joaquin cotton production records show outstanding progress during the past decade. Lint yield in this one-variety district averaged 625 pounds per acre for the first three years of the decade (1951-53) compared with 1020 pounds for the last three years (1958-60). This gain of 63 per cent in yield is attributed to a combination of (a) varietal improvements in Acala 4-42, and (b) the better “know-how” employed by the grower. Textile mills have recognized improvements in spinning quality to the extent that the demand for California's Acala 4-42 far exceeds the supply.

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Cotton breeding progress continues

John H. Turner
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Cotton breeding progress continues

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

John H. Turner, U.S. Cotton Research Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 16(2):7-7.

Published February 01, 1962

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

San Joaquin cotton production records show outstanding progress during the past decade. Lint yield in this one-variety district averaged 625 pounds per acre for the first three years of the decade (1951-53) compared with 1020 pounds for the last three years (1958-60). This gain of 63 per cent in yield is attributed to a combination of (a) varietal improvements in Acala 4-42, and (b) the better “know-how” employed by the grower. Textile mills have recognized improvements in spinning quality to the extent that the demand for California's Acala 4-42 far exceeds the supply.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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