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Behavior of short-chilling peach varieties in Southern California after warm winter of 1960–1961

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Authors

J. W. Lesley, University of California
M. M. Winslow, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(8):8-10.

Published August 01, 1961

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Abstract

In southern California peaches frequently are not exposed to winter chilling sufficient to break the rest period. The dormant condition of the flower and leaf buds is prolonged and symptoms sometimes known as delayed foliation appear. Flower and leaf bud growth are late and irregular; the fruit ripens irregularly and, in extreme cases, there is little or no crop. The fall and winter temperatures of the buds and twigs are critical. Pruning has a localized growth-stimulating effect and spraying at the proper time with an oil-in-water emulsion containing DNO—dinitro-o-cyclohexyl phenol—or DNC—3-5-dinitro-o-cresol may be helpful.

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Behavior of short-chilling peach varieties in Southern California after warm winter of 1960–1961

J. W. Lesley, M. M. Winslow
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Behavior of short-chilling peach varieties in Southern California after warm winter of 1960–1961

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. W. Lesley, University of California
M. M. Winslow, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(8):8-10.

Published August 01, 1961

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

In southern California peaches frequently are not exposed to winter chilling sufficient to break the rest period. The dormant condition of the flower and leaf buds is prolonged and symptoms sometimes known as delayed foliation appear. Flower and leaf bud growth are late and irregular; the fruit ripens irregularly and, in extreme cases, there is little or no crop. The fall and winter temperatures of the buds and twigs are critical. Pruning has a localized growth-stimulating effect and spraying at the proper time with an oil-in-water emulsion containing DNO—dinitro-o-cyclohexyl phenol—or DNC—3-5-dinitro-o-cresol may be helpful.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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