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A lysimeter study of sulfur fertilization of an annual-range soil

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Authors

Cyrus M. McKell, University of California
William A. Williams, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(4):4-5.

Published April 01, 1961

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Abstract

A lysimeter study, to determine the rate and frequency of sulfur fertilization and the source of sulfur for maximum returns, was initiated with the annual legume, rose clover, on Vista sandy loam. Such factors as the availability of sulfur in the soil, sulfur supplied by precipitation and air contact, leaching losses, and the uptake of sulfur by clover plants were considered in the study.

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Author notes

The Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U. S. Forest Service, cooperated in the experiments.

A lysimeter study of sulfur fertilization of an annual-range soil

Cyrus M. McKell, William A. Williams
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

A lysimeter study of sulfur fertilization of an annual-range soil

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Cyrus M. McKell, University of California
William A. Williams, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(4):4-5.

Published April 01, 1961

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A lysimeter study, to determine the rate and frequency of sulfur fertilization and the source of sulfur for maximum returns, was initiated with the annual legume, rose clover, on Vista sandy loam. Such factors as the availability of sulfur in the soil, sulfur supplied by precipitation and air contact, leaching losses, and the uptake of sulfur by clover plants were considered in the study.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U. S. Forest Service, cooperated in the experiments.


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