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California Agriculture
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Studies on self- and cross-pollination of olives under varying temperature conditions

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Authors

Muriel V. Bradle, University of California
William H. Griggs, University of California
Hudson T. Hartmann, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(3):4-5.

Published March 01, 1961

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Abstract

Investigations with Ascolano, Manzanillo, and Sevillano olive varieties show that chances of fertilization and fruit set are much greater after cross-pollination than after self-pollination. Pollen tube growth usually is faster following cross-pollination than after self-pollination and more pollen tubes can reach embryo sacs before the sacs degenerate.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1096.

Studies on self- and cross-pollination of olives under varying temperature conditions

Muriel V. Bradle, William H. Griggs, Hudson T. Hartmann
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Studies on self- and cross-pollination of olives under varying temperature conditions

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Muriel V. Bradle, University of California
William H. Griggs, University of California
Hudson T. Hartmann, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 15(3):4-5.

Published March 01, 1961

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Investigations with Ascolano, Manzanillo, and Sevillano olive varieties show that chances of fertilization and fruit set are much greater after cross-pollination than after self-pollination. Pollen tube growth usually is faster following cross-pollination than after self-pollination and more pollen tubes can reach embryo sacs before the sacs degenerate.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1096.


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