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Plantclimates of California: Zones of similar plant responses and their possible interpretation by effective day-night temperatures

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Authors

M. H. Kimball, University of California, Los Angeles.
F. A. Brooks, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(5):7-12.

Published May 01, 1959

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Abstract

Climate is one–and perhaps the most important–of the fundamental determinants of what plants can be grown in a given area. Climate, in this broad sense, includes temperature, total annual rainfall and seasonal distribution, as well as atmospheric humidity, air movement and light and other factors.

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Author notes

F. W. Went, Director of the Earhart Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in Experimental Control of Plant Growth, 1957, reported the research on the effect of four-dimensional relationship of day and night temperatures on plant growth which was basic information for the study reported in the foregoing article. He also devised the system of relating United States Weather Bureau data to phytotron temperatures, called effective day and effective night temperatures in this article.

G. C. Hanna, Olericulturist, University of California, Davis, reported the effect on tomatoes of the high night temperatures that occurred in 1958 in the Sacramento-San Joaquin growing areas.

Plantclimates of California: Zones of similar plant responses and their possible interpretation by effective day-night temperatures

M. H. Kimball, F. A. Brooks
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Plantclimates of California: Zones of similar plant responses and their possible interpretation by effective day-night temperatures

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

M. H. Kimball, University of California, Los Angeles.
F. A. Brooks, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(5):7-12.

Published May 01, 1959

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Climate is one–and perhaps the most important–of the fundamental determinants of what plants can be grown in a given area. Climate, in this broad sense, includes temperature, total annual rainfall and seasonal distribution, as well as atmospheric humidity, air movement and light and other factors.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

F. W. Went, Director of the Earhart Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in Experimental Control of Plant Growth, 1957, reported the research on the effect of four-dimensional relationship of day and night temperatures on plant growth which was basic information for the study reported in the foregoing article. He also devised the system of relating United States Weather Bureau data to phytotron temperatures, called effective day and effective night temperatures in this article.

G. C. Hanna, Olericulturist, University of California, Davis, reported the effect on tomatoes of the high night temperatures that occurred in 1958 in the Sacramento-San Joaquin growing areas.


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