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Use of sorptive dusts on fleas: Control of fleas on cats and dogs achieved by treatment with dusts that are easily applied and nontoxic to pets or people

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Authors

I. Barry Tarshis, University of California, Los Angeles.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(3):13-14.

Published March 01, 1959

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Abstract

Dog and cat fleas–like so many other insects–have become resistant to a number of insecticides and pet owners report that flea infestations on pets are no longer being controlled by previously effective dusts and sprays containing chlordane, lindane and DDT. Additionally, the more effective insecticides do not last for very long periods of time and–because of their high toxicity–have to be used with caution on infested pets.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1642A.

Use of sorptive dusts on fleas: Control of fleas on cats and dogs achieved by treatment with dusts that are easily applied and nontoxic to pets or people

I. Barry Tarshis
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Use of sorptive dusts on fleas: Control of fleas on cats and dogs achieved by treatment with dusts that are easily applied and nontoxic to pets or people

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

I. Barry Tarshis, University of California, Los Angeles.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(3):13-14.

Published March 01, 1959

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Dog and cat fleas–like so many other insects–have become resistant to a number of insecticides and pet owners report that flea infestations on pets are no longer being controlled by previously effective dusts and sprays containing chlordane, lindane and DDT. Additionally, the more effective insecticides do not last for very long periods of time and–because of their high toxicity–have to be used with caution on infested pets.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1642A.


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