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Biological control of fig scale: From 67% to 100% of scale on twigs sampled in 1954 at colonization sites was found to be parasitized

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Authors

Richard L. Doutt, University of California, Berkeley

Publication Information

California Agriculture 8(8):13-13.

Published August 01, 1954

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Abstract

Two small colonies of Aphytis “C,” a wasp parasite of the fig scale–Lepido-saphes ficus (Signoret)–released in the San Joaquin Valley, one at Merced and the other near Fresno, demonstrated what is almost an axiom in biological control work: if a parasite is destined to succeed, it will take hold immediately after an adequate release on susceptible hosts.

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Author notes

The attempts to establish the parasite Physcus testaceous Masi in California in 1940 were conducted by S. E. Flanders, Professor of Biological Control, University of California, Riverside

Biological control of fig scale: From 67% to 100% of scale on twigs sampled in 1954 at colonization sites was found to be parasitized

Richard L. Doutt
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Biological control of fig scale: From 67% to 100% of scale on twigs sampled in 1954 at colonization sites was found to be parasitized

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Richard L. Doutt, University of California, Berkeley

Publication Information

California Agriculture 8(8):13-13.

Published August 01, 1954

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Two small colonies of Aphytis “C,” a wasp parasite of the fig scale–Lepido-saphes ficus (Signoret)–released in the San Joaquin Valley, one at Merced and the other near Fresno, demonstrated what is almost an axiom in biological control work: if a parasite is destined to succeed, it will take hold immediately after an adequate release on susceptible hosts.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The attempts to establish the parasite Physcus testaceous Masi in California in 1940 were conducted by S. E. Flanders, Professor of Biological Control, University of California, Riverside


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