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Codling moth on apricots: Field investigations of problem started in 1948 are to be continued during current season

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Authors

Arthur D. Borden, Experiment Station, Berkeley.
Harold F. Madsen, Experiment Station, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 3(5):4-16.

Published May 01, 1949

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Abstract

Many apricot orchards in the Santa Clara Valley have been severely attacked by the codling moth for a number of years. The losses in wormy fruit at harvest have frequently been as high as 30% to 50% of the crop. The attempts of some growers at control were usually unsatisfactory and at their request the Division of Entomology and Parasitology at Berkeley started a field investigation of the problem in the spring of 1948.

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Codling moth on apricots: Field investigations of problem started in 1948 are to be continued during current season

Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Codling moth on apricots: Field investigations of problem started in 1948 are to be continued during current season

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Arthur D. Borden, Experiment Station, Berkeley.
Harold F. Madsen, Experiment Station, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 3(5):4-16.

Published May 01, 1949

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Many apricot orchards in the Santa Clara Valley have been severely attacked by the codling moth for a number of years. The losses in wormy fruit at harvest have frequently been as high as 30% to 50% of the crop. The attempts of some growers at control were usually unsatisfactory and at their request the Division of Entomology and Parasitology at Berkeley started a field investigation of the problem in the spring of 1948.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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