California Agriculture
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Supervised control of insects: Utilizes parasites and predators and makes chemical control more efficient

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Authors

Ray F. Smith, Experiment Station, Berkeley.
Gordon L. Smith, Experiment Station, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 3(5):3-12.

Published May 01, 1949

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Abstract

Supervised control of field crop insect pests was first developed on the northwest side of the San Joaquin Valley. For three years it has been in successful operation in connection with the control of the alfalfa caterpillar, and has been expanded to the control of other pests on alfalfa and to pests of cotton. Supervised control has not been developed for such crops as deciduous and citrus fruits or truck crops. It has its possibilities on other crops but the necessary entomological information either has not been developed or has not been tested for a local supervised control district.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Projects Nos. 1020 and 1330. For further details on whether supervised control will serve for an insect control problem in a particular district consult the local Farm Advisor or the Division of Entomology and Parasitology, University of California College of Agriculture, Berkeley.

Supervised control of insects: Utilizes parasites and predators and makes chemical control more efficient

Ray F. Smith, Gordon L. Smith
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Supervised control of insects: Utilizes parasites and predators and makes chemical control more efficient

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Ray F. Smith, Experiment Station, Berkeley.
Gordon L. Smith, Experiment Station, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 3(5):3-12.

Published May 01, 1949

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Supervised control of field crop insect pests was first developed on the northwest side of the San Joaquin Valley. For three years it has been in successful operation in connection with the control of the alfalfa caterpillar, and has been expanded to the control of other pests on alfalfa and to pests of cotton. Supervised control has not been developed for such crops as deciduous and citrus fruits or truck crops. It has its possibilities on other crops but the necessary entomological information either has not been developed or has not been tested for a local supervised control district.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Projects Nos. 1020 and 1330. For further details on whether supervised control will serve for an insect control problem in a particular district consult the local Farm Advisor or the Division of Entomology and Parasitology, University of California College of Agriculture, Berkeley.


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