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Color retention: Pigmentation in processed fruits and vegetables is complex problem

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Authors

G. Mackinney, Associate Biochemist in the Experiment Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 2(12):4-12.

Published December 01, 1948

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Abstract

The accurate measurement of color in a product is a very difficult matter and is usually attempted in considerably simplified form in the food industries, as for example, by canners in standardizing and in improving the color of tomato products. It is much simpler to state that a certain tomato paste has, let us say, 0.01% lycopene—the principal coloring matter of the tomato fruit—than to measure the color, which means, in effect, describing its redness in quantitative terms.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based in part upon Research Project No. 1111.

Color retention: Pigmentation in processed fruits and vegetables is complex problem

G. Mackinney
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Color retention: Pigmentation in processed fruits and vegetables is complex problem

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

G. Mackinney, Associate Biochemist in the Experiment Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 2(12):4-12.

Published December 01, 1948

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The accurate measurement of color in a product is a very difficult matter and is usually attempted in considerably simplified form in the food industries, as for example, by canners in standardizing and in improving the color of tomato products. It is much simpler to state that a certain tomato paste has, let us say, 0.01% lycopene—the principal coloring matter of the tomato fruit—than to measure the color, which means, in effect, describing its redness in quantitative terms.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based in part upon Research Project No. 1111.


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