California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 47, No.2

Small is bountiful: A special report on small farms.
Cover:  With the help of UC Small Farm Advisor Pedro Ilic, Fresno County farmer Chan Eagle has obtained abundant yields of Japanese eggplant – tenfold the output of some surrounding farms. She also grows oriental herbs and other specialty vegetables.
March-April 1993
Volume 47, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

UC program helps small farmers reap big harvest
by John Stumbos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
California small farms are on the rise – contrary to trends nationwide.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Sierra Nevada foothills, new farmers learn to use cover crops and biological pest controls to protect the organic produce they grow for farmers' markets, upscale restaurants and grocery stores.
Small farmers: Who are they and why do they matter?
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Southeast Asian refugees learn modern farming methods
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sidebar: San Diego farmers put ‘sustainability’ into practice
by J. Stumbos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most conspicuous characteristic of agriculture in San Diego's coastal north is not the farms. It is urban encroachment. Housing developments. Golf courses. Shopping centers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most conspicuous characteristic of agriculture in San Diego's coastal north is not the farms. It is urban encroachment. Housing developments. Golf courses. Shopping centers.
“Tastings” open doors to new markets for small growers
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sonoma County farmers carve out new market niche
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
The small farm: It's innovative and persistent in a changing world
by Desmond A. Jolly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Family-owned small farms generate numerous benefits to agriculture and society, but also face economic challenge.
Small farms contribute new crops and new practices to agricultural production, and to achieve efficiency, some use resources as successfully as do much larger operations. Small farms, it is hoped, will continue their vital role in U.S. agriculture—even as major changes occur today in international trade.
It takes a lot of effort but… There's an “active market” today for small farm loans
by Karen Klonsky
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several credit institutions have eased access to credit for small farmers.
Credit availability is a common constraint for small farmers. The biggest problem is that the cost of making loans does not vary much with the size of the loan. Therefore, the earnings potential for the lender is much greater from a large loan than a small loan. There are other problems such as lack of collateral or high risk of specialty crops that limit access to credit for many small farmers. Despite these difficulties, the Farmers Home Administration, the Farm Credit System and several innovative lenders in the private sector have developed programs to improve the credit environment for small borrowers.
Angled luffa, bitter melon, fuzzy melon, yard-long bean… Postharvest handling of Asian specialty vegetables under study
by Ru-Jing Zong, Marita I. Cantwell, Leonard L. Morris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Asian specialty vegetables bitter melon, fuzzy melon, luffa and yard-long bean require good temperature management during postharvest handling to reduce deterioration and to avoid chilling injury. These vegetables can be successfully marketed for 1 to 2 weeks if kept at 10° to 12.5°C (50° to 55°F).
Popularity has spawned diversity - and rules - at certified farmers' markets
by Kathleen Peck, Ronald E. Voss, James I. Grieshop, Joan Wright, Martha Stiles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
As a result of the dramatically increasing popularity of farmers' markets, some markets have reached capacity and have been obliged to establish policies about who has priority to sell. Small, part-time, hobby farmers feel particularly vulnerable as rules are established. The best way for them to go: Reserve market space far in advance and offer unique produce.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 47, No.2

Small is bountiful: A special report on small farms.
Cover:  With the help of UC Small Farm Advisor Pedro Ilic, Fresno County farmer Chan Eagle has obtained abundant yields of Japanese eggplant – tenfold the output of some surrounding farms. She also grows oriental herbs and other specialty vegetables.
March-April 1993
Volume 47, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

UC program helps small farmers reap big harvest
by John Stumbos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
California small farms are on the rise – contrary to trends nationwide.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Sierra Nevada foothills, new farmers learn to use cover crops and biological pest controls to protect the organic produce they grow for farmers' markets, upscale restaurants and grocery stores.
Small farmers: Who are they and why do they matter?
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Southeast Asian refugees learn modern farming methods
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sidebar: San Diego farmers put ‘sustainability’ into practice
by J. Stumbos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most conspicuous characteristic of agriculture in San Diego's coastal north is not the farms. It is urban encroachment. Housing developments. Golf courses. Shopping centers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most conspicuous characteristic of agriculture in San Diego's coastal north is not the farms. It is urban encroachment. Housing developments. Golf courses. Shopping centers.
“Tastings” open doors to new markets for small growers
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sonoma County farmers carve out new market niche
by J. Stumbos
Full text HTML  | PDF  
The small farm: It's innovative and persistent in a changing world
by Desmond A. Jolly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Family-owned small farms generate numerous benefits to agriculture and society, but also face economic challenge.
Small farms contribute new crops and new practices to agricultural production, and to achieve efficiency, some use resources as successfully as do much larger operations. Small farms, it is hoped, will continue their vital role in U.S. agriculture—even as major changes occur today in international trade.
It takes a lot of effort but… There's an “active market” today for small farm loans
by Karen Klonsky
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several credit institutions have eased access to credit for small farmers.
Credit availability is a common constraint for small farmers. The biggest problem is that the cost of making loans does not vary much with the size of the loan. Therefore, the earnings potential for the lender is much greater from a large loan than a small loan. There are other problems such as lack of collateral or high risk of specialty crops that limit access to credit for many small farmers. Despite these difficulties, the Farmers Home Administration, the Farm Credit System and several innovative lenders in the private sector have developed programs to improve the credit environment for small borrowers.
Angled luffa, bitter melon, fuzzy melon, yard-long bean… Postharvest handling of Asian specialty vegetables under study
by Ru-Jing Zong, Marita I. Cantwell, Leonard L. Morris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Asian specialty vegetables bitter melon, fuzzy melon, luffa and yard-long bean require good temperature management during postharvest handling to reduce deterioration and to avoid chilling injury. These vegetables can be successfully marketed for 1 to 2 weeks if kept at 10° to 12.5°C (50° to 55°F).
Popularity has spawned diversity - and rules - at certified farmers' markets
by Kathleen Peck, Ronald E. Voss, James I. Grieshop, Joan Wright, Martha Stiles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
As a result of the dramatically increasing popularity of farmers' markets, some markets have reached capacity and have been obliged to establish policies about who has priority to sell. Small, part-time, hobby farmers feel particularly vulnerable as rules are established. The best way for them to go: Reserve market space far in advance and offer unique produce.

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