California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 30, No.5

Cover:  Above left, adult female Cales noaki, an import from Chile, and, right, adult female Amitus spiniferus from Mexico, both effective parasites of wooly whitefly (below).
May 1976
Volume 30, Number 5

Research articles

Biological control of woolly whitefly
by Paul Debach, Mike Rose
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The woolly whitefly, Aleurothrixus floccosus Mask., first discovered in residential San Diego during November 1966 surveys for the citrus whitefly, has been of deep concern to the citrus industry , the University of California, and various agricultural agencies. In 1968, a study by Harold Lewis for the California-Arizona Citrus League estimated potential losses to California citrus of $10 per acre for either whitefly or a 17 percent average increase in total pest control costs statewide.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The woolly whitefly, Aleurothrixus floccosus Mask., first discovered in residential San Diego during November 1966 surveys for the citrus whitefly, has been of deep concern to the citrus industry , the University of California, and various agricultural agencies. In 1968, a study by Harold Lewis for the California-Arizona Citrus League estimated potential losses to California citrus of $10 per acre for either whitefly or a 17 percent average increase in total pest control costs statewide.
Applying phosphorus through drip irrigation systems
by R. S. Rauschkolb, D. E. Rolston, R. J. Miller, A. B. Carlton, R. G. Burau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The permanency of the water delivery systems such as drip irrigation systems and of some crops makes it desirable, if not essential, to have the capability of applying fertilizer through the irrigation system. Such a method of fertilizer application saves labor and energy and allows crop demand to determine the timing of nutrient application.
The disadvantages of clogging drip lines and assumed lack of movement have prevented the application of orthophosphate through drip irrigation systems. Orthosphosphoric acid can be applied without these disadvantages when extreme care is used. Organic phosphates such as glycerophosphate will move farther in soils, are easily applied through the drip system without clogging, and P is readily used by plants.
Walnut blight control
by W. H. Olson, W. J. Moller, L. B. Fitch, R. B. Jeter
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Walnut blight, caused by the bacterial organism Xanthomonas juglandis, is a disease of worldwide importance on walnuts. In northern California, blight may occur on a number of commercial varieties of English walnuts, although late-blooming varieties generally escape infection by leafing out after most of the spring rains are over.
Experiments indicate that the number and timing of treatments for optimum control of walnut blight vary with the season, rainfall being the governing factor. There was no evidence that any one control chemical was superior to another.
Reducing set in ruby seedless grapes with gibberellin
by Fred Jensen, Fred Swanson, George Leavitt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ruby Seedless is a red seedless variety used as a table grape and for the freezer. The clusters are well filled to compact. In some vineyards, looser clusters would be desirable to reduce bunch rot and to facilitate packing. Gibberellin sprays reduce set in Thompson Seedless and several wine varieties, so trials were established with Ruby Seedless to determine the possible benefits.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ruby Seedless is a red seedless variety used as a table grape and for the freezer. The clusters are well filled to compact. In some vineyards, looser clusters would be desirable to reduce bunch rot and to facilitate packing. Gibberellin sprays reduce set in Thompson Seedless and several wine varieties, so trials were established with Ruby Seedless to determine the possible benefits.
Increasing growth and yield of ‘thompson seedless’ vines by trellising
by A. N. Kasimatis, Lloyd A. Lider, W. Mark Kliewer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The five-year summary of results of a trellising tria1 with ‘Thompson Seedless’ vines grown in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a wide, four- wire double crossarm trellis increased vine growth by 38 percent, crop yields by 20 percent, and soluble solids by nearly 3 percent, when compared with a one-wire trellis. When a two- wire single cross-arm trellis was compared with a one- wire trellis the gain in vine growth was 14 percent, yield was enchanced by 13 percent, and soluble solids were the same.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The five-year summary of results of a trellising tria1 with ‘Thompson Seedless’ vines grown in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a wide, four- wire double crossarm trellis increased vine growth by 38 percent, crop yields by 20 percent, and soluble solids by nearly 3 percent, when compared with a one-wire trellis. When a two- wire single cross-arm trellis was compared with a one- wire trellis the gain in vine growth was 14 percent, yield was enchanced by 13 percent, and soluble solids were the same.
Pear and apple scab control
by J.L. Joos, B. E. Bearden, A. Berlowitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not abailable – first paragraph follows: Pear and apple scab fungi Veenturia pirina Ader. and Venturia inaequal-is (Cke.) Wint. caused major losses to growers in the pear and apple regions of the north coast counties of California in the 1974 and 1975 seasons. These diseases have become more important in recent years, especially on pears in Mendocino and Lake counties and on apples in the Sebastopol, Sonoma County region.
New research on pear and apple scab in the north coast counties of California indicates that Benlate and Cyprex are highly effective as back action materials and resulted in a supplemental label for Benlate on pears. With more accurate prediction of scab infection, more effective use of these materials can be made.
Influence of variety and cutting stage on oat hay yields
by C. A. Schoner, T. E. Kearney, J. D. Prato
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Demand for oat hay has been stimulated by an increasing number of pleasure horses in California. Production now involves more than 250,000 acres annually in the state, on irrigated as well as dry- farmed lands.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Demand for oat hay has been stimulated by an increasing number of pleasure horses in California. Production now involves more than 250,000 acres annually in the state, on irrigated as well as dry- farmed lands.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Resources for tomorrow
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Filling a blank
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Understanding malaria
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Once is enough
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Multi-purpose greenbelts
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tougher turf
by Editors
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California Agriculture, Vol. 30, No.5

Cover:  Above left, adult female Cales noaki, an import from Chile, and, right, adult female Amitus spiniferus from Mexico, both effective parasites of wooly whitefly (below).
May 1976
Volume 30, Number 5

Research articles

Biological control of woolly whitefly
by Paul Debach, Mike Rose
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The woolly whitefly, Aleurothrixus floccosus Mask., first discovered in residential San Diego during November 1966 surveys for the citrus whitefly, has been of deep concern to the citrus industry , the University of California, and various agricultural agencies. In 1968, a study by Harold Lewis for the California-Arizona Citrus League estimated potential losses to California citrus of $10 per acre for either whitefly or a 17 percent average increase in total pest control costs statewide.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The woolly whitefly, Aleurothrixus floccosus Mask., first discovered in residential San Diego during November 1966 surveys for the citrus whitefly, has been of deep concern to the citrus industry , the University of California, and various agricultural agencies. In 1968, a study by Harold Lewis for the California-Arizona Citrus League estimated potential losses to California citrus of $10 per acre for either whitefly or a 17 percent average increase in total pest control costs statewide.
Applying phosphorus through drip irrigation systems
by R. S. Rauschkolb, D. E. Rolston, R. J. Miller, A. B. Carlton, R. G. Burau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The permanency of the water delivery systems such as drip irrigation systems and of some crops makes it desirable, if not essential, to have the capability of applying fertilizer through the irrigation system. Such a method of fertilizer application saves labor and energy and allows crop demand to determine the timing of nutrient application.
The disadvantages of clogging drip lines and assumed lack of movement have prevented the application of orthophosphate through drip irrigation systems. Orthosphosphoric acid can be applied without these disadvantages when extreme care is used. Organic phosphates such as glycerophosphate will move farther in soils, are easily applied through the drip system without clogging, and P is readily used by plants.
Walnut blight control
by W. H. Olson, W. J. Moller, L. B. Fitch, R. B. Jeter
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Walnut blight, caused by the bacterial organism Xanthomonas juglandis, is a disease of worldwide importance on walnuts. In northern California, blight may occur on a number of commercial varieties of English walnuts, although late-blooming varieties generally escape infection by leafing out after most of the spring rains are over.
Experiments indicate that the number and timing of treatments for optimum control of walnut blight vary with the season, rainfall being the governing factor. There was no evidence that any one control chemical was superior to another.
Reducing set in ruby seedless grapes with gibberellin
by Fred Jensen, Fred Swanson, George Leavitt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ruby Seedless is a red seedless variety used as a table grape and for the freezer. The clusters are well filled to compact. In some vineyards, looser clusters would be desirable to reduce bunch rot and to facilitate packing. Gibberellin sprays reduce set in Thompson Seedless and several wine varieties, so trials were established with Ruby Seedless to determine the possible benefits.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ruby Seedless is a red seedless variety used as a table grape and for the freezer. The clusters are well filled to compact. In some vineyards, looser clusters would be desirable to reduce bunch rot and to facilitate packing. Gibberellin sprays reduce set in Thompson Seedless and several wine varieties, so trials were established with Ruby Seedless to determine the possible benefits.
Increasing growth and yield of ‘thompson seedless’ vines by trellising
by A. N. Kasimatis, Lloyd A. Lider, W. Mark Kliewer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The five-year summary of results of a trellising tria1 with ‘Thompson Seedless’ vines grown in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a wide, four- wire double crossarm trellis increased vine growth by 38 percent, crop yields by 20 percent, and soluble solids by nearly 3 percent, when compared with a one-wire trellis. When a two- wire single cross-arm trellis was compared with a one- wire trellis the gain in vine growth was 14 percent, yield was enchanced by 13 percent, and soluble solids were the same.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The five-year summary of results of a trellising tria1 with ‘Thompson Seedless’ vines grown in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a wide, four- wire double crossarm trellis increased vine growth by 38 percent, crop yields by 20 percent, and soluble solids by nearly 3 percent, when compared with a one-wire trellis. When a two- wire single cross-arm trellis was compared with a one- wire trellis the gain in vine growth was 14 percent, yield was enchanced by 13 percent, and soluble solids were the same.
Pear and apple scab control
by J.L. Joos, B. E. Bearden, A. Berlowitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not abailable – first paragraph follows: Pear and apple scab fungi Veenturia pirina Ader. and Venturia inaequal-is (Cke.) Wint. caused major losses to growers in the pear and apple regions of the north coast counties of California in the 1974 and 1975 seasons. These diseases have become more important in recent years, especially on pears in Mendocino and Lake counties and on apples in the Sebastopol, Sonoma County region.
New research on pear and apple scab in the north coast counties of California indicates that Benlate and Cyprex are highly effective as back action materials and resulted in a supplemental label for Benlate on pears. With more accurate prediction of scab infection, more effective use of these materials can be made.
Influence of variety and cutting stage on oat hay yields
by C. A. Schoner, T. E. Kearney, J. D. Prato
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Demand for oat hay has been stimulated by an increasing number of pleasure horses in California. Production now involves more than 250,000 acres annually in the state, on irrigated as well as dry- farmed lands.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Demand for oat hay has been stimulated by an increasing number of pleasure horses in California. Production now involves more than 250,000 acres annually in the state, on irrigated as well as dry- farmed lands.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Resources for tomorrow
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Filling a blank
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Understanding malaria
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Once is enough
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Multi-purpose greenbelts
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tougher turf
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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