California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Letter

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Authors

Kimberly A. Crum
Karen Watts

Publication Information

California Agriculture 50(6):4-4.

Published November 01, 1996

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Dear Editor:

“Growers Prefer Personal Delivery of UC Information,” an article appearing in the May-June issue, overlooked the significant contributions of pesticide consultants.

The California Agricultural Production Consultants Association (CAPCA) would like to stress the need and importance of the role of the licensed pest control adviser (PCA) in this state's production of safe and abundant food, fiber and flowers. CAPCA believes that California growers and producers are able to have a variety and selection of many resources to assist in their decision-making process. CAPCA members have always stressed the need to work cooperatively with the local and state farm advisor and cooperative extension staff.

The article should have pointed out the unique working relationship that the California growers and pest management industry have; in fact, the PCA and the farm advisors are interdependent resources to the grower community. Without the success of the farm advisors, the PCAs could not achieve their educational development. Likewise, the field practices and trials performed daily by PCAs lend to the successful research and development by the farm advisors.

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Author notes

The California Agricultural Production Consultants Association (CAPCA) represents 3,600 of the 4,800 licensed pest control advisers (PCAs) that provide pest management consultation for agricultural industries of this state.

Letter

Kimberly A. Crum, Karen Watts
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Letter

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Kimberly A. Crum
Karen Watts

Publication Information

California Agriculture 50(6):4-4.

Published November 01, 1996

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Full text

Dear Editor:

“Growers Prefer Personal Delivery of UC Information,” an article appearing in the May-June issue, overlooked the significant contributions of pesticide consultants.

The California Agricultural Production Consultants Association (CAPCA) would like to stress the need and importance of the role of the licensed pest control adviser (PCA) in this state's production of safe and abundant food, fiber and flowers. CAPCA believes that California growers and producers are able to have a variety and selection of many resources to assist in their decision-making process. CAPCA members have always stressed the need to work cooperatively with the local and state farm advisor and cooperative extension staff.

The article should have pointed out the unique working relationship that the California growers and pest management industry have; in fact, the PCA and the farm advisors are interdependent resources to the grower community. Without the success of the farm advisors, the PCAs could not achieve their educational development. Likewise, the field practices and trials performed daily by PCAs lend to the successful research and development by the farm advisors.

Return to top

Author notes

The California Agricultural Production Consultants Association (CAPCA) represents 3,600 of the 4,800 licensed pest control advisers (PCAs) that provide pest management consultation for agricultural industries of this state.


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Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu