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Free trade impactsMexico's tomato processing industry may gain

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California Agriculture 45(5):10-14.

Published September 01, 1991

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Abstract

The tomato processing industry has expanded more rapidly in Mexico than the fresh tomato industry. Export of tomato paste to the United States has doubled since 1986 and will increase still further when the US. tariff is eliminated under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA). This will permit Mexico to displace other suppliers to the U.S. market (such as Chile, Turkey and Taiwan). It will probably cause lower prices for U.S. producers as well.(Editor's note: Most tonnage statistics in this paper are in metric tons. In a few cases, U.S. tons have been used, and so designated. For conversion purposes, 1 metric ton = 2,205 lb; 1 US. ton =2,000 lb.)

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Free trade impactsMexico's tomato processing industry may gain

Kirby S. Moulton
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Free trade impactsMexico's tomato processing industry may gain

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Publication Information

California Agriculture 45(5):10-14.

Published September 01, 1991

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

The tomato processing industry has expanded more rapidly in Mexico than the fresh tomato industry. Export of tomato paste to the United States has doubled since 1986 and will increase still further when the US. tariff is eliminated under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA). This will permit Mexico to displace other suppliers to the U.S. market (such as Chile, Turkey and Taiwan). It will probably cause lower prices for U.S. producers as well.(Editor's note: Most tonnage statistics in this paper are in metric tons. In a few cases, U.S. tons have been used, and so designated. For conversion purposes, 1 metric ton = 2,205 lb; 1 US. ton =2,000 lb.)

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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