California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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Management of navel orangeworm and ants

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Authors

William W. Barnett
Lonnie C. Hendricks
Wesley K. Asai
Rachel B. Elkins
Debra Boquist, University of California
Clyde L. Elmore, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(4):21-22.

Published July 01, 1989

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Orchard cover crops are generally thought to be beneficial in the management of pests, especially certain insects and mites. Depending on how they are manipulated, however, cover crops have the potential to increase damage from some pests. If cover crops are not managed correctly-for example, are mowed at the wrong time or are under stress for moisture-plant-feeding insects may move from the orchard floor into the trees to feed on developing fruit.

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Management of navel orangeworm and ants

William W. Barnett, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Wesley K. Asai, Rachel B. Elkins, Debra Boquist, Clyde L. Elmore
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Management of navel orangeworm and ants

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

William W. Barnett
Lonnie C. Hendricks
Wesley K. Asai
Rachel B. Elkins
Debra Boquist, University of California
Clyde L. Elmore, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 43(4):21-22.

Published July 01, 1989

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Orchard cover crops are generally thought to be beneficial in the management of pests, especially certain insects and mites. Depending on how they are manipulated, however, cover crops have the potential to increase damage from some pests. If cover crops are not managed correctly-for example, are mowed at the wrong time or are under stress for moisture-plant-feeding insects may move from the orchard floor into the trees to feed on developing fruit.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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