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‘Escaped’ artichokes are troublesome pests

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Authors

Craig D. Thomsen, Division of Plant Industry, California Department of Food and Agriculture, University of California, Davis
G. Douglas Barbe, Division of Plant Industry, California Department of Food and Agriculture, University of California, Davis
William A. Williams, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
Melvin George, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 40(3):7-9.

Published March 01, 1986

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Abstract

Cultivated artichokes can revert to a wild, hard-to-control thistle formThe century-old battle against artichoke thistle — the wild relative of that epicurean delight, globe artichoke — is not over. Dense infestations that take over prime grazing land persist in many areas of the state. Control costs can exceed the value of the land.

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Author notes

The authors thank Dawn Lawson (Camp Pendleton), Ken Smith, Bob Clark and Jose Uribe (Orange County), Casey Jones (Alameda County), Joe Mraz (Solano County) for field tours. Walt Graves (San Diego County), Tim Gorden (Alameda County), Bart Hosman and Roger Epperson (Contra Costa County), Bill Tidwell and Deborah Hillyard (Orange County) provided distribution data. Grover Roberts (California Farm Bureau Federation) allowed review of a statewide questionnaire for estimated county acreage. This study was in part funded by the Public Service Research and Dissemination Program. Additional support was provided by the California Department of Food and Agriculture.

‘Escaped’ artichokes are troublesome pests

Craig D. Thomsen, G. Douglas Barbe, William A. Williams, Melvin George
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

‘Escaped’ artichokes are troublesome pests

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Craig D. Thomsen, Division of Plant Industry, California Department of Food and Agriculture, University of California, Davis
G. Douglas Barbe, Division of Plant Industry, California Department of Food and Agriculture, University of California, Davis
William A. Williams, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis
Melvin George, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 40(3):7-9.

Published March 01, 1986

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Cultivated artichokes can revert to a wild, hard-to-control thistle formThe century-old battle against artichoke thistle — the wild relative of that epicurean delight, globe artichoke — is not over. Dense infestations that take over prime grazing land persist in many areas of the state. Control costs can exceed the value of the land.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The authors thank Dawn Lawson (Camp Pendleton), Ken Smith, Bob Clark and Jose Uribe (Orange County), Casey Jones (Alameda County), Joe Mraz (Solano County) for field tours. Walt Graves (San Diego County), Tim Gorden (Alameda County), Bart Hosman and Roger Epperson (Contra Costa County), Bill Tidwell and Deborah Hillyard (Orange County) provided distribution data. Grover Roberts (California Farm Bureau Federation) allowed review of a statewide questionnaire for estimated county acreage. This study was in part funded by the Public Service Research and Dissemination Program. Additional support was provided by the California Department of Food and Agriculture.


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