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Biological control of leafminers in greenhouse chrysanthemums

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Authors

Vincent P. Jones, Cooperative Extension, University of California, Riverside
Michael P. Parrella, Department of Entomology, UC Riverside
Donald R. Hodel, Cooperative Extension, Los Angeles County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 40(1):10-12.

Published January 01, 1986

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Abstract

A parasitic wasp controlled L. trifolii, reducing need for insecticidesLeafminers have become the most serious pest of greenhouse chrysanthemums — one of California's major cut-flower crops. Biological control alone is generally considered impractical, but it can augment present chemical control strategies against this pest. (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)

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Author notes

The authors thank Mr. and Mrs. Bill Yokoyama for their cooperation and for providing the experimental plot, and Dr. M.B. Stoetzel and Dr. T.J. Henry for identification of the aphids and plant bugs, respectively. This research was supported in part by a grant from the American Florists Endowment.

Biological control of leafminers in greenhouse chrysanthemums

Vincent P. Jones, Michael P. Parrella, Donald R. Hodel
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Biological control of leafminers in greenhouse chrysanthemums

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Vincent P. Jones, Cooperative Extension, University of California, Riverside
Michael P. Parrella, Department of Entomology, UC Riverside
Donald R. Hodel, Cooperative Extension, Los Angeles County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 40(1):10-12.

Published January 01, 1986

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A parasitic wasp controlled L. trifolii, reducing need for insecticidesLeafminers have become the most serious pest of greenhouse chrysanthemums — one of California's major cut-flower crops. Biological control alone is generally considered impractical, but it can augment present chemical control strategies against this pest. (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The authors thank Mr. and Mrs. Bill Yokoyama for their cooperation and for providing the experimental plot, and Dr. M.B. Stoetzel and Dr. T.J. Henry for identification of the aphids and plant bugs, respectively. This research was supported in part by a grant from the American Florists Endowment.


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