California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Pheromone monitoring is cost-effective

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robin T. Ervin, University of California
Daniel S. Moreno, University of California
John L. Baritelle, University of California
Philip D. Gardner, Department of Soils and Environmental Sciences

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(9):17-19.

Published September 01, 1985

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Although several beneficial insect parasites control California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell) in southern California desert citrus-growing areas, parasites are much less effective in the San Joaquin Valley. Chemical control has been the standard practice in Valley citrus, but potential development of resistance in California red scale has led to a search for alternative methods. Two articles in the May-June issue of California Agriculture discussed computer simulation of red scale populations and prediction of infestations by trapping males. The following two articles report on CRS development in relation to degree-days and on the economic value of pheromone monitoring. The research has been funded by the Citrus Research Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and University of California Integrated Pest Management Project.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Pheromone monitoring is cost-effective

Robin T. Ervin, Daniel S. Moreno, John L. Baritelle, Philip D. Gardner
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Pheromone monitoring is cost-effective

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robin T. Ervin, University of California
Daniel S. Moreno, University of California
John L. Baritelle, University of California
Philip D. Gardner, Department of Soils and Environmental Sciences

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(9):17-19.

Published September 01, 1985

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Although several beneficial insect parasites control California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell) in southern California desert citrus-growing areas, parasites are much less effective in the San Joaquin Valley. Chemical control has been the standard practice in Valley citrus, but potential development of resistance in California red scale has led to a search for alternative methods. Two articles in the May-June issue of California Agriculture discussed computer simulation of red scale populations and prediction of infestations by trapping males. The following two articles report on CRS development in relation to degree-days and on the economic value of pheromone monitoring. The research has been funded by the Citrus Research Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and University of California Integrated Pest Management Project.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu