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Understanding coyote behavior

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Authors

Walter E. Howard , Division of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California
Roy Teranishi, Western Regional Research Center
Rex E. Marsh, Division of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California
Jerry H. Scrivner, Division of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(3):4-7.

Published March 01, 1985

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Abstract

The coyote, Canis latrans, originally found only in the western United States, has followed man and his live-stock south to Costa Rica, east to the Atlantic, and north into Alaska. It is the principal predator of sheep in California. (Cover photo by Barbara Butler)

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Author notes

Over the years, many people contributed to this research, which has been part of Western Regional Project W-123 and Western Regional Cooperative Committee 26. Special thanks go to the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station, Dubois, Idaho, to USDA-ARS, USDA Special Grants, and to the California legislature for funding much of this research. The authors thank the following for their cooperation: Alfred H. Murphy, Superintendent, UC Hopland Field Station; Douglas A. Barnum, Barbara A. Butler, Ann M. Casler-Fagre, Guy E. Connolly, Maynard W. Cummings, Daniel B. Fagre, William M. Longhurst, Sheila McKenna-Kruse, Gary E. Nesse, Robert H. Schmidt, Robert M. Timm, Mark Tobin, Dale A. Wade, Edwin L. Murphy, Thomas H. Schuitz, and Donald J. Stern. All chemical compounds tested were obtained from the Western Regional Research Center. Animal Damage Control of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided much advice and assistance.

Understanding coyote behavior

Walter E. Howard, Roy Teranishi, Rex E. Marsh, Jerry H. Scrivner
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Understanding coyote behavior

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Walter E. Howard , Division of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California
Roy Teranishi, Western Regional Research Center
Rex E. Marsh, Division of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California
Jerry H. Scrivner, Division of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(3):4-7.

Published March 01, 1985

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The coyote, Canis latrans, originally found only in the western United States, has followed man and his live-stock south to Costa Rica, east to the Atlantic, and north into Alaska. It is the principal predator of sheep in California. (Cover photo by Barbara Butler)

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Over the years, many people contributed to this research, which has been part of Western Regional Project W-123 and Western Regional Cooperative Committee 26. Special thanks go to the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station, Dubois, Idaho, to USDA-ARS, USDA Special Grants, and to the California legislature for funding much of this research. The authors thank the following for their cooperation: Alfred H. Murphy, Superintendent, UC Hopland Field Station; Douglas A. Barnum, Barbara A. Butler, Ann M. Casler-Fagre, Guy E. Connolly, Maynard W. Cummings, Daniel B. Fagre, William M. Longhurst, Sheila McKenna-Kruse, Gary E. Nesse, Robert H. Schmidt, Robert M. Timm, Mark Tobin, Dale A. Wade, Edwin L. Murphy, Thomas H. Schuitz, and Donald J. Stern. All chemical compounds tested were obtained from the Western Regional Research Center. Animal Damage Control of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided much advice and assistance.


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