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Air pollution causes moderate damage to tomatoes

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Authors

Patrick J. Temple, University of California
Kris A. Surano, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
Randall Mutters, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences
Gail E. Bingham, Utah State University
Joseph H. Shinn, LLNL

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(3):20-22.

Published March 01, 1985

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Abstract

In California's Central Valley, where most processing tomatoes are grown, ozone caused slight damage in one year, none in the next.

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Author notes

This work was conducted under cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Energy Commission. Although this research was funded in part by USEPA through Inter agency Agreement EPA-82-D-X0533 with G.E. Bingham, this article has not been subjected to agency review and therefore does not necessarily reflect the view of the agency. No official endorsement should be inferred. The cooperation of the grower, John Paulsen, is gratefully acknowledged.

Air pollution causes moderate damage to tomatoes

Patrick J. Temple, Kris A. Surano, Randall Mutters, Gail E. Bingham, Joseph H. Shinn
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Air pollution causes moderate damage to tomatoes

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Patrick J. Temple, University of California
Kris A. Surano, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
Randall Mutters, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences
Gail E. Bingham, Utah State University
Joseph H. Shinn, LLNL

Publication Information

California Agriculture 39(3):20-22.

Published March 01, 1985

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

In California's Central Valley, where most processing tomatoes are grown, ozone caused slight damage in one year, none in the next.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This work was conducted under cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Energy Commission. Although this research was funded in part by USEPA through Inter agency Agreement EPA-82-D-X0533 with G.E. Bingham, this article has not been subjected to agency review and therefore does not necessarily reflect the view of the agency. No official endorsement should be inferred. The cooperation of the grower, John Paulsen, is gratefully acknowledged.


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