California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Economics of salinity management

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Charles V. Moore, University of California
J. Herbert Snyder, Department of Agricultural Economics

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):46-46.

Published October 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: With future water supplies for agriculture likely to be increasingly limited, it is important to consider direct use of water of impaired quality — increasing use and resue over time of water with varying levels of total dissolved solids. Plant breeding will provide some salt-tolerant varieties that can produce yields nearly equivalent to those of crops traditionally produced in areas without salinity problems. Harmful physical and economic effects may thus be lessened, but farms in areas unaffected by salt buildup may still be able to produce better quality products at lower cost than those in salt-affected areas.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Economics of salinity management

Charles V. Moore, J. Herbert Snyder
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Economics of salinity management

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Charles V. Moore, University of California
J. Herbert Snyder, Department of Agricultural Economics

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):46-46.

Published October 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: With future water supplies for agriculture likely to be increasingly limited, it is important to consider direct use of water of impaired quality — increasing use and resue over time of water with varying levels of total dissolved solids. Plant breeding will provide some salt-tolerant varieties that can produce yields nearly equivalent to those of crops traditionally produced in areas without salinity problems. Harmful physical and economic effects may thus be lessened, but farms in areas unaffected by salt buildup may still be able to produce better quality products at lower cost than those in salt-affected areas.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu