California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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Salinity, photosynthesis, and leaf growth

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Authors

Norman Terry , University of California
Lawrence J. Waldron, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):38-39.

Published October 01, 1984

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Manipulation of the plant's environment to reduce salinity will continue to be the principal management strategy in the future. Competition for limited quantities of high-quality water, however, may eventually force growers to use lower quality water, such as municipal and irrigation return flows. Development of new, more salt-tolerant crops and crop varieties will therefore provide an important supplemental means of managing salinity.

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Salinity, photosynthesis, and leaf growth

Norman Terry, Lawrence J. Waldron
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Salinity, photosynthesis, and leaf growth

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Norman Terry , University of California
Lawrence J. Waldron, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):38-39.

Published October 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Manipulation of the plant's environment to reduce salinity will continue to be the principal management strategy in the future. Competition for limited quantities of high-quality water, however, may eventually force growers to use lower quality water, such as municipal and irrigation return flows. Development of new, more salt-tolerant crops and crop varieties will therefore provide an important supplemental means of managing salinity.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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