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Effects of salt on cell membranes of germinating seeds

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Authors

Richard D. Bliss, University of California
Kathryn A. Platt-Aloia, University of California
William W. Thomson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):24-25.

Published October 01, 1984

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Salt stress inhibits growth throughout the plant life cycle, but seed germination is generally the most sensitive stage. Salt stress mimics water stress in many ways, leading to the suggestion that the principal effect of salt is osmotic. However, since some salts are more inhibitory than others, specific toxic effects must also be involved. Although sodium chloride is among the less toxic salts, it is one of the most common and thus one of the most troublesome to agriculture.

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Author notes

Funding for this work was provided by the Kearney Foundation of Soil Science.

Effects of salt on cell membranes of germinating seeds

Richard D. Bliss, Kathryn A. Platt-Aloia, William W. Thomson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effects of salt on cell membranes of germinating seeds

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Richard D. Bliss, University of California
Kathryn A. Platt-Aloia, University of California
William W. Thomson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):24-25.

Published October 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Salt stress inhibits growth throughout the plant life cycle, but seed germination is generally the most sensitive stage. Salt stress mimics water stress in many ways, leading to the suggestion that the principal effect of salt is osmotic. However, since some salts are more inhibitory than others, specific toxic effects must also be involved. Although sodium chloride is among the less toxic salts, it is one of the most common and thus one of the most troublesome to agriculture.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Funding for this work was provided by the Kearney Foundation of Soil Science.


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