California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Case history: San Joaquin Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Louis A. Beck, California Department of Water Resources

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):16-17.

Published October 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Most of the San Joaquin Valley has been farmed in one fashion or another for more than a hundred years The Valley trough was generally dry-farmed until deep-well turbine pumps were developed in the 1930s and 1940s and irrigation became common. Even though much of the land was in production, it was not irrigated every year: there was some pattern of rotation, such as dry-farming for one year, irrigation for two, and fallow for one. Now, almost 5 million acres of agricultural land on the Valley floor are irrigated.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Case history: San Joaquin Valley

Louis A. Beck
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Case history: San Joaquin Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Louis A. Beck, California Department of Water Resources

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(10):16-17.

Published October 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Most of the San Joaquin Valley has been farmed in one fashion or another for more than a hundred years The Valley trough was generally dry-farmed until deep-well turbine pumps were developed in the 1930s and 1940s and irrigation became common. Even though much of the land was in production, it was not irrigated every year: there was some pattern of rotation, such as dry-farming for one year, irrigation for two, and fallow for one. Now, almost 5 million acres of agricultural land on the Valley floor are irrigated.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu