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Efficacy of cotton defoliants

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Authors

Thomas A. Kerby, USDA Cotton Research Station
Stephanie Johnson, USDA Cotton Research Station
Hidemi Yamada, UC West Side Field Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(9):24-25.

Published September 01, 1984

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Chemical defoliation is a standard practice on all 1.31 million acres of cotton grown in California (10-year average acreage). In many cases, a second treatment is required to prepare plants for harvest. Irrigation and nitrogen management have a large effect on the amount of vegetative growth produced. Cultural practices that stimulate growth reduce the effectiveness of chemicals.

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Efficacy of cotton defoliants

Thomas A. Kerby, Stephanie Johnson, Hidemi Yamada
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Efficacy of cotton defoliants

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Thomas A. Kerby, USDA Cotton Research Station
Stephanie Johnson, USDA Cotton Research Station
Hidemi Yamada, UC West Side Field Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(9):24-25.

Published September 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Chemical defoliation is a standard practice on all 1.31 million acres of cotton grown in California (10-year average acreage). In many cases, a second treatment is required to prepare plants for harvest. Irrigation and nitrogen management have a large effect on the amount of vegetative growth produced. Cultural practices that stimulate growth reduce the effectiveness of chemicals.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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