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Aerial movements of mites in almonds: Implications for pest management

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Authors

Marjorie A. Hoy, University of California
Hugo E. van de Baan, Agricultural University
J. J. Rob Groot, Agricultural University
Ross P. Field, Keith Turnbull Research Institute

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(9):21-23.

Published September 01, 1984

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites and predatory mites can live all year on deciduous trees and vines. During the growing season they colonize the foliage, and during winter they overwinter under bark and in crevices in a state of dormancy (diapause). Spider mites and predatory mites can move from plant to plant by walking or they can be accidentally transferred by other organisms. Spider mites are also known to disperse aerially, and clusters of spider mite females can sometimes be seen on the tips of branches before their dispersal. Some spider mite species drop from leaves on thin silk strands and are picked up by the wind.

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Author notes

The authors thank Frances Cave, Darryl Castro, and Dan Cahn for their assistance; C. V. Horton, who made his orchards available for tests; and William W. Barnett, Area Specialist, Cooperative Extension, Fresno County, and Lonnie C. Hendricks, Farm Advisor, Cooperative Extension, Merced County, for their cooperation. This project is supported in part by funds from the Almond Board of California; UC/IPM Program; Experiment Station Project 3522–H; and Western Regional Project-84.

Aerial movements of mites in almonds: Implications for pest management

Marjorie A. Hoy, Hugo E. van de Baan, J. J. Rob Groot, Ross P. Field
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Aerial movements of mites in almonds: Implications for pest management

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Marjorie A. Hoy, University of California
Hugo E. van de Baan, Agricultural University
J. J. Rob Groot, Agricultural University
Ross P. Field, Keith Turnbull Research Institute

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(9):21-23.

Published September 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites and predatory mites can live all year on deciduous trees and vines. During the growing season they colonize the foliage, and during winter they overwinter under bark and in crevices in a state of dormancy (diapause). Spider mites and predatory mites can move from plant to plant by walking or they can be accidentally transferred by other organisms. Spider mites are also known to disperse aerially, and clusters of spider mite females can sometimes be seen on the tips of branches before their dispersal. Some spider mite species drop from leaves on thin silk strands and are picked up by the wind.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The authors thank Frances Cave, Darryl Castro, and Dan Cahn for their assistance; C. V. Horton, who made his orchards available for tests; and William W. Barnett, Area Specialist, Cooperative Extension, Fresno County, and Lonnie C. Hendricks, Farm Advisor, Cooperative Extension, Merced County, for their cooperation. This project is supported in part by funds from the Almond Board of California; UC/IPM Program; Experiment Station Project 3522–H; and Western Regional Project-84.


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