California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Deep cultivation and gypsum as potential solutions to slow water penetration

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Authors

Michael J. Singer , Department of Land, Air, and Water Reosurces
John R. Munn, Department of Land, Air, and Water Reosurces
William E. Wildman, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(7):16-18.

Published July 01, 1984

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 2.5 million acres of California farmland have some form of water penetration problem during the irrigation season, according to a recent survey by Cooperative Extension farm advisors. In some cases, simply increasing the length or frequency of irrigation may alleviate the problem and provide sufficient water to the crop. In other cases, the problem is more serious: crop yields are reduced and health and vigor of trees and vines are adversely affected, even with careful water management.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Partial eupport for this work came from the Prune and Walnul Advisory Boords.

Deep cultivation and gypsum as potential solutions to slow water penetration

Michael J. Singer, John R. Munn, William E. Wildman
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Deep cultivation and gypsum as potential solutions to slow water penetration

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Michael J. Singer , Department of Land, Air, and Water Reosurces
John R. Munn, Department of Land, Air, and Water Reosurces
William E. Wildman, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 38(7):16-18.

Published July 01, 1984

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Over 2.5 million acres of California farmland have some form of water penetration problem during the irrigation season, according to a recent survey by Cooperative Extension farm advisors. In some cases, simply increasing the length or frequency of irrigation may alleviate the problem and provide sufficient water to the crop. In other cases, the problem is more serious: crop yields are reduced and health and vigor of trees and vines are adversely affected, even with careful water management.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Partial eupport for this work came from the Prune and Walnul Advisory Boords.


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