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Dairy cow corral behavior

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Authors

Thomas A. Shultz

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(11):9-11.

Published November 01, 1983

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: The corral confinement system used for intensive dairying in the Central Valley and southern California subjects the cow to various types of stress, particularly following parturition and during peak lactation. The effect of weather on these animals is of primary concern, especially in the hot, dry summer, when temperatures average highs of 95° F, with numerous days over 100° F, and relative humidity averaging 33 percent. Winters in the area are usually cool and mild; spring and fall are moderately warm.

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Author notes

The author acknowledges John Soares, staff field assistant, who helped compile data, and the following dairies: Cardoza Brothers and Sons, Tipton; Wilbur Brothers, Felipe Ribeiro and Sons, and Lone Palm Holsteins, Tulare; Edgerly Farms, Dinuba; William Van Beek and Case DeJong, Visalia; and Norman Martin, Stratford.

Dairy cow corral behavior

Thomas A. Shultz
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Dairy cow corral behavior

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Thomas A. Shultz

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(11):9-11.

Published November 01, 1983

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: The corral confinement system used for intensive dairying in the Central Valley and southern California subjects the cow to various types of stress, particularly following parturition and during peak lactation. The effect of weather on these animals is of primary concern, especially in the hot, dry summer, when temperatures average highs of 95° F, with numerous days over 100° F, and relative humidity averaging 33 percent. Winters in the area are usually cool and mild; spring and fall are moderately warm.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The author acknowledges John Soares, staff field assistant, who helped compile data, and the following dairies: Cardoza Brothers and Sons, Tipton; Wilbur Brothers, Felipe Ribeiro and Sons, and Lone Palm Holsteins, Tulare; Edgerly Farms, Dinuba; William Van Beek and Case DeJong, Visalia; and Norman Martin, Stratford.


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